Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Previous studies have shown strong evidence that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) Fluoxetine reduces aggression and inhibits learning in Siamese Fighting Fish (Betta Splendens). While this evidence has been replicated across multiple studies, the behavioral mechanism of Fluoxetine on aggressive behavior and learning is still unknown. In particular, Fluoxetine may produce its anti-aggressive effects by altering the motivational arousal component of aggressive responding or through the sedation of motoric activity. In order to examine these two models, a maze-swimming task for access to reinforcing aggressive opportunities was implemented. Based on previous evidence, researchers hypothesized that subjects would have decreased rates of aggressive responding to mirror and live conspecific stimuli when exposed to Fluoxetine than when not being administered the drug through either the blocking of motor or motivational functions. Results from this study indicated that Fluoxetine administration reduces the appetitive properties of aggressive encounters through inhibition of motor processes which impacted the performance of the fish in the task. Based on these results, further studies should focus on the relationship of serotonin pathways on arousal and motor processes in operant and classically conditioned behavior.

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Life Sciences

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Apr 15th, 11:00 AM Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

The Effects of Fluoxetine on Aggressive Behaviour in Betta Splendens

Previous studies have shown strong evidence that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) Fluoxetine reduces aggression and inhibits learning in Siamese Fighting Fish (Betta Splendens). While this evidence has been replicated across multiple studies, the behavioral mechanism of Fluoxetine on aggressive behavior and learning is still unknown. In particular, Fluoxetine may produce its anti-aggressive effects by altering the motivational arousal component of aggressive responding or through the sedation of motoric activity. In order to examine these two models, a maze-swimming task for access to reinforcing aggressive opportunities was implemented. Based on previous evidence, researchers hypothesized that subjects would have decreased rates of aggressive responding to mirror and live conspecific stimuli when exposed to Fluoxetine than when not being administered the drug through either the blocking of motor or motivational functions. Results from this study indicated that Fluoxetine administration reduces the appetitive properties of aggressive encounters through inhibition of motor processes which impacted the performance of the fish in the task. Based on these results, further studies should focus on the relationship of serotonin pathways on arousal and motor processes in operant and classically conditioned behavior.