Title

Ice Cream: Is It Really a Thin Liquid?

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Patients consume thin liquids on a daily basis to meet their hydration needs. Liquids including water, coffee, tea, milk, and soda, are just a few examples of thin liquids. Many patients with dysphagia are restricted from thin liquids due to the risk of aspiration; and it is standard practice to restrict these same patients from having ice cream. The rationale for restricting ice cream is the assumption that once ice cream melts it becomes a thin liquid. However, there is no hard evidence that ice cream is in fact a thin liquid when it melts, nor is there evidence that the ice cream melts quick enough to act like a thin liquid when swallowed. The goal in this research study is to gather information about practice patterns of speech therapists across the country regarding ice cream and to objectively determine whether or not ice cream behaves like a thin liquid. The study has two parts. Part 1 involves surveying speech therapists across the country to get a clear understanding of individual policies and/or work policies regarding ice cream for patients who are restricted from thin liquids. We also gathered information about why these policies were put into place and where speech therapists obtained information to inform the policy. Part 2 of the study involves testing the viscosity of four different types of ice cream using a Ford viscosity cup to objectively determine if any are considered a thin liquid when fully melted.

Category

Life Sciences

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Apr 15th, 11:00 AM Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

Ice Cream: Is It Really a Thin Liquid?

Patients consume thin liquids on a daily basis to meet their hydration needs. Liquids including water, coffee, tea, milk, and soda, are just a few examples of thin liquids. Many patients with dysphagia are restricted from thin liquids due to the risk of aspiration; and it is standard practice to restrict these same patients from having ice cream. The rationale for restricting ice cream is the assumption that once ice cream melts it becomes a thin liquid. However, there is no hard evidence that ice cream is in fact a thin liquid when it melts, nor is there evidence that the ice cream melts quick enough to act like a thin liquid when swallowed. The goal in this research study is to gather information about practice patterns of speech therapists across the country regarding ice cream and to objectively determine whether or not ice cream behaves like a thin liquid. The study has two parts. Part 1 involves surveying speech therapists across the country to get a clear understanding of individual policies and/or work policies regarding ice cream for patients who are restricted from thin liquids. We also gathered information about why these policies were put into place and where speech therapists obtained information to inform the policy. Part 2 of the study involves testing the viscosity of four different types of ice cream using a Ford viscosity cup to objectively determine if any are considered a thin liquid when fully melted.