Title

Another Look at Alliteration

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Alliteration has been a long-standing phonological awareness learning goal in preschool classrooms. A young child’s ability to isolate beginning sounds in words by the end of pre-kindergarten is one of the best predictors of literacy learning in second grade. However, the body of research describing the progression of how and when young children learn alliteration skills is limited. Some studies report significant floor effects, others used a range of tasks that make comparison of results challenging. The purpose of this study was to identify the progression of alliteration skill ability in 3- to 5-year-old children within a range of tasks to detect, identify, and produce beginning sounds in words. Researchers developed a range of tasks based on previous studies and used these to assess a sample of young children to determine trends in alliteration development. The study sample was recruited from a variety of agencies serving preschool children. The study results will allow better understanding of the hierarchy of phonological awareness development and appropriate instruction in preschool settings.

Category

Social Sciences

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Apr 15th, 11:00 AM Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

Another Look at Alliteration

Alliteration has been a long-standing phonological awareness learning goal in preschool classrooms. A young child’s ability to isolate beginning sounds in words by the end of pre-kindergarten is one of the best predictors of literacy learning in second grade. However, the body of research describing the progression of how and when young children learn alliteration skills is limited. Some studies report significant floor effects, others used a range of tasks that make comparison of results challenging. The purpose of this study was to identify the progression of alliteration skill ability in 3- to 5-year-old children within a range of tasks to detect, identify, and produce beginning sounds in words. Researchers developed a range of tasks based on previous studies and used these to assess a sample of young children to determine trends in alliteration development. The study sample was recruited from a variety of agencies serving preschool children. The study results will allow better understanding of the hierarchy of phonological awareness development and appropriate instruction in preschool settings.