Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Educational philosophies have differed and been disputed over time for centuries. These philosophies are concrete ideas regarding the education of citizens; elaborating upon the rolls of both disciples and tutors (teachers). Education has been paramount to the formation of a citizen, who is then expected to function within a given society. Each philosophy regarding education is unique in its approach to educating and forming a citizen to fit the mold of each philosopher’s utopia. Each selected philosophical review is derived from, Classic and Contemporary Readings in the Philosophy of Education, by Steven M. Cahn. An analysis of Plato, Aristotle, John Locke, and Rousseau provides insight toward varying educational strategies. Plato asserts that a proper education leads to guardianship throughout a society and leadership among individuals; Aristotle declares in his education theory that a young well-rounded citizens is achieved through a balanced education of fun and intellectual materials; John Locke extends his theory beyond that of natural intellect, stressing that all children are born with the innate ability to learn and form important social relationships; and Rousseau theorizes that children should be placed in a natural learning environment without the overwhelming pressures of an educator or monotonous lessons, rather education should lead to the formation of a social contract. All four of these philosophers assert varying views regarding how to educate a citizen, the role of the teacher, and what a perfect society looks like. A common thread throughout these philosophies is the necessity of the teacher throughout the learning process. It is up to the teacher to exert an influence over the child to channel creativity, elicit morality, encourage intellect, and acts as a model for what a proper citizen should look like.

Category

Humanities

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Apr 15th, 3:00 PM Apr 15th, 4:00 PM

A Literary Review of Select Educational Philosophies

Educational philosophies have differed and been disputed over time for centuries. These philosophies are concrete ideas regarding the education of citizens; elaborating upon the rolls of both disciples and tutors (teachers). Education has been paramount to the formation of a citizen, who is then expected to function within a given society. Each philosophy regarding education is unique in its approach to educating and forming a citizen to fit the mold of each philosopher’s utopia. Each selected philosophical review is derived from, Classic and Contemporary Readings in the Philosophy of Education, by Steven M. Cahn. An analysis of Plato, Aristotle, John Locke, and Rousseau provides insight toward varying educational strategies. Plato asserts that a proper education leads to guardianship throughout a society and leadership among individuals; Aristotle declares in his education theory that a young well-rounded citizens is achieved through a balanced education of fun and intellectual materials; John Locke extends his theory beyond that of natural intellect, stressing that all children are born with the innate ability to learn and form important social relationships; and Rousseau theorizes that children should be placed in a natural learning environment without the overwhelming pressures of an educator or monotonous lessons, rather education should lead to the formation of a social contract. All four of these philosophers assert varying views regarding how to educate a citizen, the role of the teacher, and what a perfect society looks like. A common thread throughout these philosophies is the necessity of the teacher throughout the learning process. It is up to the teacher to exert an influence over the child to channel creativity, elicit morality, encourage intellect, and acts as a model for what a proper citizen should look like.