Presenter Information

Maira L. AmbrisFollow

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) have a high risk of developing dysphagia resulting from radiation therapy (RT) with or without joint chemoradiation (CRT). Dysphagia reduces the quality of life (QOL) of these patients through psychosocial factors, reduction of effective swallowing, damage to the swallowing mechanism, and swallowing pain. The purpose of this investigation is to examine the effectiveness of two types of prophylactic swallowing exercises (PSE) in preventing dysphagia in patients with HNC who are receiving RT/CRT to maximize QOL by reducing the possible effects of dysphagia and related issues.

18 patients were selected based on the requirements of having a diagnosis of stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma in the head or neck treated with RT, and no previous radiation treatment for head and neck cancer. Patients were at least 18 years old and capable to make medical decisions under cognitive, mental, and legal circumstances.

Patients participated in an initial swallow assessment with either Modified Barium Swallow (MBS) or Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (FEES). Patients who met the criteria were randomly assigned to either a combination of indirect and direct swallowing exercises group (D-PSE) or indirect swallowing group (ID-PSE). The D-PSE group was prescribed the Mendelsohn Maneuver, Effortful Swallow, Masako, and Shaker exercises to be completed three times per day during RT/CRT. The ID-PSE group was prescribed a tongue-based retraction exercise, lingual range of motion (ROM), jaw ROM, Shaker exercise, and pharyngeal squeeze, three times per day during RT/CRT. At data collection intervals, swallowing function and QOL related to swallowing were measured with a nutrition and pain questionnaire, the FOIS, EAT-20, and MDADI questionnaires.

Results indicate patients with HNC participating in PSE show significant improvement over patients who do not receive prophylactic swallowing treatment. Both PSE groups demonstrate similar findings to those of similar studies, providing support of PSE interventions for patients in this population.

Category

Health and Medical Science

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Apr 28th, 11:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:00 PM

Contrasting Two Prophylactic-Dysphagia Interventions for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer Treated with Radiotherapy with or without Adjunctive Chemotherapy

UC South Ballroom

Patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) have a high risk of developing dysphagia resulting from radiation therapy (RT) with or without joint chemoradiation (CRT). Dysphagia reduces the quality of life (QOL) of these patients through psychosocial factors, reduction of effective swallowing, damage to the swallowing mechanism, and swallowing pain. The purpose of this investigation is to examine the effectiveness of two types of prophylactic swallowing exercises (PSE) in preventing dysphagia in patients with HNC who are receiving RT/CRT to maximize QOL by reducing the possible effects of dysphagia and related issues.

18 patients were selected based on the requirements of having a diagnosis of stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma in the head or neck treated with RT, and no previous radiation treatment for head and neck cancer. Patients were at least 18 years old and capable to make medical decisions under cognitive, mental, and legal circumstances.

Patients participated in an initial swallow assessment with either Modified Barium Swallow (MBS) or Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (FEES). Patients who met the criteria were randomly assigned to either a combination of indirect and direct swallowing exercises group (D-PSE) or indirect swallowing group (ID-PSE). The D-PSE group was prescribed the Mendelsohn Maneuver, Effortful Swallow, Masako, and Shaker exercises to be completed three times per day during RT/CRT. The ID-PSE group was prescribed a tongue-based retraction exercise, lingual range of motion (ROM), jaw ROM, Shaker exercise, and pharyngeal squeeze, three times per day during RT/CRT. At data collection intervals, swallowing function and QOL related to swallowing were measured with a nutrition and pain questionnaire, the FOIS, EAT-20, and MDADI questionnaires.

Results indicate patients with HNC participating in PSE show significant improvement over patients who do not receive prophylactic swallowing treatment. Both PSE groups demonstrate similar findings to those of similar studies, providing support of PSE interventions for patients in this population.