Title

How is Digital Data Transmitted Wirelessly and Used within a Control System?

Presenter Information

Sean McChesney

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Wireless communications has become the dominant force within the communications field. Investigation into the inner workings of wireless technology and how information can be encoded, transmitted, decoded and processed across vast distances is a pivotal area of research worldwide. With this in mind, I researched and developed a wireless communications system using the most widely used form of modulation, Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK), and a control system to parse the intelligence. I first built the modulator system which encodes binary information within a carrier signal and was then sent out an antennae as electromagnetic waves. These waves are then received by another antennae connected to a demodulator circuit, for signal stability and demodulation. The second system built was the parallel to serial binary data converter, which creates the binary wave form sent to the modulator input. Followed by the demodulator circuit, which removes the carrier from the intelligence signal. The demodulator is connected to a serial to parallel converter circuit which parses out the data stream into a four bit parallel code. The parsed bits are used as input by a control system to perform various actions. In this case, to control the actions of two motors and the power on/power off functionality. Once the system was complete, I began testing its ability to obtain weak or scrambled signals, showing the advantages of Phase Shift Keying compared to Frequency Shift Keying and Amplitude Shift Keying. The tests show how PSK is superior, compared to the other keying methods, when sending data in areas with high densities of electromagnetic frequencies (EMF) because changes to the amplitude and frequency of a traveling signal can easily be easily distorted; where the phase of a wireless signal is least affected by various mediums and conditions.

Category

Physical Sciences

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 28th, 11:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:00 PM

How is Digital Data Transmitted Wirelessly and Used within a Control System?

UC South Ballroom

Wireless communications has become the dominant force within the communications field. Investigation into the inner workings of wireless technology and how information can be encoded, transmitted, decoded and processed across vast distances is a pivotal area of research worldwide. With this in mind, I researched and developed a wireless communications system using the most widely used form of modulation, Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK), and a control system to parse the intelligence. I first built the modulator system which encodes binary information within a carrier signal and was then sent out an antennae as electromagnetic waves. These waves are then received by another antennae connected to a demodulator circuit, for signal stability and demodulation. The second system built was the parallel to serial binary data converter, which creates the binary wave form sent to the modulator input. Followed by the demodulator circuit, which removes the carrier from the intelligence signal. The demodulator is connected to a serial to parallel converter circuit which parses out the data stream into a four bit parallel code. The parsed bits are used as input by a control system to perform various actions. In this case, to control the actions of two motors and the power on/power off functionality. Once the system was complete, I began testing its ability to obtain weak or scrambled signals, showing the advantages of Phase Shift Keying compared to Frequency Shift Keying and Amplitude Shift Keying. The tests show how PSK is superior, compared to the other keying methods, when sending data in areas with high densities of electromagnetic frequencies (EMF) because changes to the amplitude and frequency of a traveling signal can easily be easily distorted; where the phase of a wireless signal is least affected by various mediums and conditions.