Presentation Type

Poster - Campus Access Only

Abstract

Respiratory Function Within a novel Dystrophic Mice model

Purpose: Duchene Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disease resulting in progressive heart and skeletal muscle degeneration. The disease is characterized by inadequate dystrophin content in muscle cells. With no known cure, it’s essential to discover a medical intervention for DMD pathology. This research group explored variations of a nutritional based therapy as a potential treatment to DMD pathology, including respiratory dysfunction. Early results suggest that dietary quercetin supplementation may improve respiratory function but strategies for maximizing quercetin efficacy are needed. In this investigation respiratory function was examined following a new dietary approach of nicotinamide riboside(NR)+quercetin(Q).

Methods: The University of Montana Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee approved animal use. Respiratory function was examined in a novel strain of dystrophin deficient (D2) mice and control mice (D2J) using a buxco whole body plethysmography device. Mice received a 12-minute Buxco chamber acclimation period followed by 8-minutes of respiratory data collection. Experimental conditions included control, Q, NR, and Q+NR enrichment. Baseline measurement at 4-months were compared to 6-months of age - following 2 months of treatment. Variables assessed were: respiratory rate, tidal volume, minute ventilation, inspiratory time, expiratory time, and relaxation time(Tr) between breaths. ANOVA with repeated measures were performed to determine mouse strain, time, and treatment relationships. Significant difference between variables was set at p= ≤0.05, a priori.

Results: Data analyses presented significant time-dependent differences for all variables, indicating age-dependent changes in respiratory function. Analyses of relaxation time reveal a significant strain difference in relaxation time, with D2 dystrophic mice having longer mean Tr times(p=0.000). No other significant differences were observed in either strain or treatment groups over the 6-month mark.

Conclusion: In conclusion, other than dystrophic mice having longer mean Tr times, all mice exhibit similar age-dependent changes in respiratory function with no other strain or treatment relationships present.

Category

Health and Medical Science

Available for download on Sunday, April 19, 2020

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Apr 28th, 11:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:00 PM

Respiratory Function Within a novel Dystrophic Mice model

UC South Ballroom

Respiratory Function Within a novel Dystrophic Mice model

Purpose: Duchene Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disease resulting in progressive heart and skeletal muscle degeneration. The disease is characterized by inadequate dystrophin content in muscle cells. With no known cure, it’s essential to discover a medical intervention for DMD pathology. This research group explored variations of a nutritional based therapy as a potential treatment to DMD pathology, including respiratory dysfunction. Early results suggest that dietary quercetin supplementation may improve respiratory function but strategies for maximizing quercetin efficacy are needed. In this investigation respiratory function was examined following a new dietary approach of nicotinamide riboside(NR)+quercetin(Q).

Methods: The University of Montana Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee approved animal use. Respiratory function was examined in a novel strain of dystrophin deficient (D2) mice and control mice (D2J) using a buxco whole body plethysmography device. Mice received a 12-minute Buxco chamber acclimation period followed by 8-minutes of respiratory data collection. Experimental conditions included control, Q, NR, and Q+NR enrichment. Baseline measurement at 4-months were compared to 6-months of age - following 2 months of treatment. Variables assessed were: respiratory rate, tidal volume, minute ventilation, inspiratory time, expiratory time, and relaxation time(Tr) between breaths. ANOVA with repeated measures were performed to determine mouse strain, time, and treatment relationships. Significant difference between variables was set at p= ≤0.05, a priori.

Results: Data analyses presented significant time-dependent differences for all variables, indicating age-dependent changes in respiratory function. Analyses of relaxation time reveal a significant strain difference in relaxation time, with D2 dystrophic mice having longer mean Tr times(p=0.000). No other significant differences were observed in either strain or treatment groups over the 6-month mark.

Conclusion: In conclusion, other than dystrophic mice having longer mean Tr times, all mice exhibit similar age-dependent changes in respiratory function with no other strain or treatment relationships present.