Presentation Type

Poster - Campus Access Only

Abstract

Transactional Communication Between Caregivers and Stroke Survivors

Communication breakdowns between a person with aphasia (PWA) and their caregiver can have significant negative influences on their daily lives. Transactional communication, broadly defined as an exchange of messages or language between a sender and a receiver, is often impaired during conversations between caregivers and a PWA. Research indicates that improving transactional communication between the PWA and caregiver can also improve impaired communication as well as the psychosocial well-being between the PWA and caregiver.

The purpose of this project is to analyze previously collected transactional communication samples obtained from prompted conversations between PWAs and caregivers who participated in an innovative stroke rehabilitation program called an intensive comprehensive aphasia program (ICAP) designed to improve the speech, language, cognition, and psychosocial well-being of PWA. The ICAP service delivery model provides up to 120 hours of therapy in half the amount of time that is reported in standard care. The ICAP treatment model is new, with approximately 12-15 ICAPS existing worldwide, one of which was developed at the University of Montana. Eight PWA-caregiver dyads participated in transactional communication samples before and after an ICAP during the summer of 2016. These 16 video-recorded samples will be transcribed, coded for positive and negative communication behaviors, and analyzed using qualitative methodology to evaluate the efficacy of this ICAP and its effects on transactional communication between PWAs and caregivers. Samples are currently being transcribed and coded and preliminary qualitative data will be reported for approximately 3-5 participating dyads. Increased education and communicative training for caregivers and PWAs leads to increased communicative success, a better overall understanding of aphasia, and increased confidence in communication. This ICAP has the potential to decrease stress seen in these interactions and thus increase confidence and psychosocial well-being in PWAs and caregivers.

Category

Health and Medical Science

Available for download on Sunday, April 19, 2020

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Apr 28th, 11:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:00 PM

Transactional Communication Between Caregivers and Stroke Survivors Following an Intensive Comprehensive Aphasia Program

UC South Ballroom

Transactional Communication Between Caregivers and Stroke Survivors

Communication breakdowns between a person with aphasia (PWA) and their caregiver can have significant negative influences on their daily lives. Transactional communication, broadly defined as an exchange of messages or language between a sender and a receiver, is often impaired during conversations between caregivers and a PWA. Research indicates that improving transactional communication between the PWA and caregiver can also improve impaired communication as well as the psychosocial well-being between the PWA and caregiver.

The purpose of this project is to analyze previously collected transactional communication samples obtained from prompted conversations between PWAs and caregivers who participated in an innovative stroke rehabilitation program called an intensive comprehensive aphasia program (ICAP) designed to improve the speech, language, cognition, and psychosocial well-being of PWA. The ICAP service delivery model provides up to 120 hours of therapy in half the amount of time that is reported in standard care. The ICAP treatment model is new, with approximately 12-15 ICAPS existing worldwide, one of which was developed at the University of Montana. Eight PWA-caregiver dyads participated in transactional communication samples before and after an ICAP during the summer of 2016. These 16 video-recorded samples will be transcribed, coded for positive and negative communication behaviors, and analyzed using qualitative methodology to evaluate the efficacy of this ICAP and its effects on transactional communication between PWAs and caregivers. Samples are currently being transcribed and coded and preliminary qualitative data will be reported for approximately 3-5 participating dyads. Increased education and communicative training for caregivers and PWAs leads to increased communicative success, a better overall understanding of aphasia, and increased confidence in communication. This ICAP has the potential to decrease stress seen in these interactions and thus increase confidence and psychosocial well-being in PWAs and caregivers.