Presentation Type

Poster - Campus Access Only

Abstract

Purpose: Obesity in American Indian (AI) children is a major public health concern. This is important as childhood obesity increases the risk of chronic disease. The purpose of this study is to explore the physical activity (PA), sleep, screen time and demographic (grade, gender, and BMI percentile) behaviors in AI children.

Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted using a voluntary sample of AI children in the 6th- 8th grade between ages of 10-14, attending four Missoula Middle Schools. Participants were recruited through school meetings and letters sent home to parents. BMI percentile was calculated using an established algorithm.[1] Surveys collected demographics and screen time information. PA and Sleep were assessed with an Actical attached to the participant’s wrist for one week. Descriptive statistics were calculated for demographics, PA, sleep, screen time and obesity. Independent two-tailed t-tests were used to compare differences between gender and differences between weekday and weekend variables.

Results: The data revealed that 41.6% of the sample was overweight/obese and children spent an average of 4.2 hours of screen time per day. In addition, children engaged in 177.8 minutes per day in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and an averages of 8.3 hours of sleep per night. Sleep data showed that girls spent more time in bed and received 30 more minutes of sleep each night compared to boys.

Conclusion: While participants engaged in almost 180 minutes of MVPA, an average night sleep was less than the National Sleep Foundation recommendations. High amounts of weekend screen time impact PA, which raise health concerns. Further studies containing larger sample sizes are needed to further explore these patterns in AI children.

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1https://www.bcm.edu/cnrc-apps/bodycomp/bmiz2.html This BMI calculator uses CDC growth charts for children between the ages of 2-20 and calculates BMI percentile based on date of birth, age, gender, height (m) and weight (kg).

Category

Health and Medical Science

Available for download on Thursday, October 18, 2018

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Apr 28th, 3:00 PM Apr 28th, 4:00 PM

Patterns of Physical Activity, Sleep, and Screen Time in Urban American Indian Children

UC South Ballroom

Purpose: Obesity in American Indian (AI) children is a major public health concern. This is important as childhood obesity increases the risk of chronic disease. The purpose of this study is to explore the physical activity (PA), sleep, screen time and demographic (grade, gender, and BMI percentile) behaviors in AI children.

Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted using a voluntary sample of AI children in the 6th- 8th grade between ages of 10-14, attending four Missoula Middle Schools. Participants were recruited through school meetings and letters sent home to parents. BMI percentile was calculated using an established algorithm.[1] Surveys collected demographics and screen time information. PA and Sleep were assessed with an Actical attached to the participant’s wrist for one week. Descriptive statistics were calculated for demographics, PA, sleep, screen time and obesity. Independent two-tailed t-tests were used to compare differences between gender and differences between weekday and weekend variables.

Results: The data revealed that 41.6% of the sample was overweight/obese and children spent an average of 4.2 hours of screen time per day. In addition, children engaged in 177.8 minutes per day in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and an averages of 8.3 hours of sleep per night. Sleep data showed that girls spent more time in bed and received 30 more minutes of sleep each night compared to boys.

Conclusion: While participants engaged in almost 180 minutes of MVPA, an average night sleep was less than the National Sleep Foundation recommendations. High amounts of weekend screen time impact PA, which raise health concerns. Further studies containing larger sample sizes are needed to further explore these patterns in AI children.

_________________

1https://www.bcm.edu/cnrc-apps/bodycomp/bmiz2.html This BMI calculator uses CDC growth charts for children between the ages of 2-20 and calculates BMI percentile based on date of birth, age, gender, height (m) and weight (kg).