Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Abstract.

Background: The single leg hop for distance (SLHD) is the most common functional performance test utilized to determine readiness for sports participation after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee. The ability of hop distance to discern sport readiness is questionable as nearly all athletes will eventually score within normal variance and no difference in hop distance exists between those who do or do not return to sport.

Hypothesis: The quality of hop landing will serve as a more discerning metric of athlete recovery than the distance hopped when compared to their non-surgical limb or healthy norms.

Methods: Ten athletes (5 women) with no prior knee injuries served as normative group for 10 matched athletes (5 women) with unilateral ACL reconstruction (19 mo post-operatively). An 8 video camera motion capture system with force plates determined the maximum distance hopped and peak joint angles and torques during landing. Independent t-tests and paired t-tests assessed group differences and the effect size (Cohen’s d) was used to the magnitude of the differences.

Results: Distance hopped by the operated limb did not differ from the non-operated limb or the healthy group (operative=1.36±0.26m, non-operative=1.36±0.26m, Healthy=1.63±0.31m, p≥0.17, d=0.89). Conversely, the operated limb had substantially less peak knee extensor torque during hop landing compared to both the non-operated and health group (operative=1.99±0.19, non-operative=2.83±0.31, Healthy=2.88±0.31, p≤0.003, d=3.36).

Conclusions: Our measure of the quality of hop landing was more discerning of recovery after ACL reconstruction compared to the long-standing tradition of using the distance hopped to determine success.

Category

Health and Medical Science

Available for download on Sunday, April 26, 2020

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Apr 28th, 3:00 PM Apr 28th, 4:00 PM

The Clinical Significance of the Single Leg Hop in Qualifying Outcomes after ACL Reconstruction: Normative Study

UC South Ballroom

Abstract.

Background: The single leg hop for distance (SLHD) is the most common functional performance test utilized to determine readiness for sports participation after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee. The ability of hop distance to discern sport readiness is questionable as nearly all athletes will eventually score within normal variance and no difference in hop distance exists between those who do or do not return to sport.

Hypothesis: The quality of hop landing will serve as a more discerning metric of athlete recovery than the distance hopped when compared to their non-surgical limb or healthy norms.

Methods: Ten athletes (5 women) with no prior knee injuries served as normative group for 10 matched athletes (5 women) with unilateral ACL reconstruction (19 mo post-operatively). An 8 video camera motion capture system with force plates determined the maximum distance hopped and peak joint angles and torques during landing. Independent t-tests and paired t-tests assessed group differences and the effect size (Cohen’s d) was used to the magnitude of the differences.

Results: Distance hopped by the operated limb did not differ from the non-operated limb or the healthy group (operative=1.36±0.26m, non-operative=1.36±0.26m, Healthy=1.63±0.31m, p≥0.17, d=0.89). Conversely, the operated limb had substantially less peak knee extensor torque during hop landing compared to both the non-operated and health group (operative=1.99±0.19, non-operative=2.83±0.31, Healthy=2.88±0.31, p≤0.003, d=3.36).

Conclusions: Our measure of the quality of hop landing was more discerning of recovery after ACL reconstruction compared to the long-standing tradition of using the distance hopped to determine success.