Presenter Information

Alison ArthunFollow

Presentation Type

Poster - Campus Access Only

Abstract

Speech Pathologists and Audiologists give verbal directions to a client by being as clear as possible for more reliable outcomes. Altering the way a clinician will give directions can alter the outcomes of testing. Client directions can be considered linguistically into categories of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantic, and pragmatic aspects of language. Each of these consider the speaking influence of what we say in different ways. This research project examines how altering the way clinicians deliver verbal directions can alter the clients response in therapy. Placing different connotations with modifications to supra-segmental features throughout the instructional sentences and directions to a client can change the way the client will respond to the given task. The study’s focus will consider the direction one gives when explaining the procedure during an audiology air-conduction assessment. Our expectations include giving directions with a negative connotation will have a completely different outcome as to giving directions with a positive connotation. Linguistically, we also must consider prosody and intonation, and those features that have a huge impact on the way a patient would perceive what is said. It is important to understand how a certain way of speaking to a client can completely change the outcome of a test. The way someone says or explains something influences the response and outcome of the person receiving that information in a substantial manner, and proving that will impact how we can give directions within the field of speech, language and hearing.

Category

Health and Medical Science

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Apr 28th, 3:00 PM Apr 28th, 4:00 PM

The Influence of Directions on Threshold Determination In Audiological Testin

UC South Ballroom

Speech Pathologists and Audiologists give verbal directions to a client by being as clear as possible for more reliable outcomes. Altering the way a clinician will give directions can alter the outcomes of testing. Client directions can be considered linguistically into categories of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantic, and pragmatic aspects of language. Each of these consider the speaking influence of what we say in different ways. This research project examines how altering the way clinicians deliver verbal directions can alter the clients response in therapy. Placing different connotations with modifications to supra-segmental features throughout the instructional sentences and directions to a client can change the way the client will respond to the given task. The study’s focus will consider the direction one gives when explaining the procedure during an audiology air-conduction assessment. Our expectations include giving directions with a negative connotation will have a completely different outcome as to giving directions with a positive connotation. Linguistically, we also must consider prosody and intonation, and those features that have a huge impact on the way a patient would perceive what is said. It is important to understand how a certain way of speaking to a client can completely change the outcome of a test. The way someone says or explains something influences the response and outcome of the person receiving that information in a substantial manner, and proving that will impact how we can give directions within the field of speech, language and hearing.