Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Cognitive decline has recently been shown to be associated with hearing difficulties. Occupational therapists in Montana were canvassed via survey concerning their knowledge about best practice with patients who have hearing loss as well as best practice with patients who have dementia. With aging patients, many occupational therapists will encounter greater numbers of patients who exhibit either a hearing impairment and/or dementia. This presentation will focus on the differentiation between hearing loss and dementia. Oftentimes, patients with hearing loss and patients with dementia present with similar symptoms. For example, both those with hearing loss and those with dementia may need frequent repetition and reinstruction. Both those with hearing loss and those with dementia may exhibit signs of frustration, depression, and general social withdrawal. There may be increased isolation from family and friends. Despite similarities in signs and symptoms, it is critical that occupational therapists differentiate between hearing loss and dementia. This poster describes the similarities and differences between signs and symptoms of hearing loss and dementia. The survey reveals how occupational therapists in Montana differentiate, and what resources and referrals are used to help differentiate in order to implement best practice. Using these resources, occupational therapists can ultimately aid in promoting patients’ quality of life. In addition, this poster also discusses recent research revealing links between untreated hearing loss and dementia and cognitive decline. Counseling patients with suspected hearing loss and referring for appropriate hearing evaluation and remediation may help to delay or even prevent onset of dementia.

Category

Health and Medical Science

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Apr 28th, 3:00 PM Apr 28th, 4:00 PM

Is it Hearing Loss or is it Dementia? How do you know?

UC South Ballroom

Cognitive decline has recently been shown to be associated with hearing difficulties. Occupational therapists in Montana were canvassed via survey concerning their knowledge about best practice with patients who have hearing loss as well as best practice with patients who have dementia. With aging patients, many occupational therapists will encounter greater numbers of patients who exhibit either a hearing impairment and/or dementia. This presentation will focus on the differentiation between hearing loss and dementia. Oftentimes, patients with hearing loss and patients with dementia present with similar symptoms. For example, both those with hearing loss and those with dementia may need frequent repetition and reinstruction. Both those with hearing loss and those with dementia may exhibit signs of frustration, depression, and general social withdrawal. There may be increased isolation from family and friends. Despite similarities in signs and symptoms, it is critical that occupational therapists differentiate between hearing loss and dementia. This poster describes the similarities and differences between signs and symptoms of hearing loss and dementia. The survey reveals how occupational therapists in Montana differentiate, and what resources and referrals are used to help differentiate in order to implement best practice. Using these resources, occupational therapists can ultimately aid in promoting patients’ quality of life. In addition, this poster also discusses recent research revealing links between untreated hearing loss and dementia and cognitive decline. Counseling patients with suspected hearing loss and referring for appropriate hearing evaluation and remediation may help to delay or even prevent onset of dementia.