Authors' Names

Erin D. RosenkranceFollow

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Category

Social Sciences/Humanities

Abstract/Artist Statement

An Inclusive Future: Creating Interest, Diversity and Inclusion in Archaeology through Children’s Literature In the wake of major social justice movements such as the Dakota Access Pipeline, LGBTQ rights and the Black Lives Matter movement, the topics of inequality and diversity have become major talking points across the globe. In response, universities and colleges have made a call for representation by black, indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) faculty, staff and students. In the field of anthropology and archaeology the need is obvious. Sara Gonzalez, Curator of Archaeology at the Burke Museum explains, “…in educating the next generation we have an opportunity to create a new future for ourselves.” How do we garner interest within these fields and, create new futures while creating a landscape of inclusion for BIPOC students? A passion for learning and engaging with cultures at a young age is not only beneficial for learning in general but it also allows children to dream of their futures and, explore their own potential. Finding commonality with the subject is vital for this connection to occur. For many, the term archaeology stirs images of Indiana Jones, King Tut, and Mayan temples, but for those in the BIPOC community there is little connection aside from grave robbing and historic erasure, making it difficult for them to participate in the profession. Approaching the topic at an early age by introducing children to basic anthropological vocabulary, theory, and methods as through the lens of a BIPOC professional could become a means of connection for future archaeologists and anthropologists. By allowing children to discover and explore this field through literature and media, could potentially cultivate new professionals and scholars as well as extend an invitation to those not represented in mainstream media as archaeologists and anthropologists. The goal of this project is to create a children’s book of archaeology and anthropology. The book will be written from the focal point of a BIPOC professional exploring cultures and engaging with the people in the culture. The aim is to incorporate basic concepts of culture, kinship, ethnicity, and society through both written word and artwork. Both the BIPOC anthropologist and the cultural group of focus will engage in dialogue to seek out commonality, understanding, and inclusion.

Mentor Name

Nikki Manning

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An Inclusive Future: Creating Interest, Diversity and Inclusion in Archaeology through Children’s Literature

An Inclusive Future: Creating Interest, Diversity and Inclusion in Archaeology through Children’s Literature In the wake of major social justice movements such as the Dakota Access Pipeline, LGBTQ rights and the Black Lives Matter movement, the topics of inequality and diversity have become major talking points across the globe. In response, universities and colleges have made a call for representation by black, indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) faculty, staff and students. In the field of anthropology and archaeology the need is obvious. Sara Gonzalez, Curator of Archaeology at the Burke Museum explains, “…in educating the next generation we have an opportunity to create a new future for ourselves.” How do we garner interest within these fields and, create new futures while creating a landscape of inclusion for BIPOC students? A passion for learning and engaging with cultures at a young age is not only beneficial for learning in general but it also allows children to dream of their futures and, explore their own potential. Finding commonality with the subject is vital for this connection to occur. For many, the term archaeology stirs images of Indiana Jones, King Tut, and Mayan temples, but for those in the BIPOC community there is little connection aside from grave robbing and historic erasure, making it difficult for them to participate in the profession. Approaching the topic at an early age by introducing children to basic anthropological vocabulary, theory, and methods as through the lens of a BIPOC professional could become a means of connection for future archaeologists and anthropologists. By allowing children to discover and explore this field through literature and media, could potentially cultivate new professionals and scholars as well as extend an invitation to those not represented in mainstream media as archaeologists and anthropologists. The goal of this project is to create a children’s book of archaeology and anthropology. The book will be written from the focal point of a BIPOC professional exploring cultures and engaging with the people in the culture. The aim is to incorporate basic concepts of culture, kinship, ethnicity, and society through both written word and artwork. Both the BIPOC anthropologist and the cultural group of focus will engage in dialogue to seek out commonality, understanding, and inclusion.