Presenter Information

Don E. Jordan JrFollow

Presentation Type

Presentation

Faculty Mentor’s Full Name

George Furniss

Faculty Mentor’s Department

Science

Abstract

We propose to collect emergent groundwater around Hamilton, using standardized collection methods that include quality assurance and control samples with analysis performed at a certified drinking water testing laboratory (Energy Labs). Nitrate background in natural groundwater systems should contain less than 1 mg/L nitrates (U.S. Geologic Survey) but in our aquifer, nitrates/nitrites should be less than 0.25 mg/L based on previous sampling.

We will map the locations of the samples and use local hydrology data to help determine the source and flow direction of the groundwater. Routine testing and reporting of groundwater quality in our community will help protect our health and the economy of our river. Groundwater in sand and gravel aquifers from shallow wells supplies all the Hamilton area drinking water.

The aquifers receive recharge from streams and ditches flowing in from the sides of the valley and the shallow aquifers discharge to the Bitterroot River and to ditches that flow past the west and north edge of Hamilton. We plan to collect about a dozen samples in an arc around the down gradient edge of Hamilton from these groundwater discharges.

Nitrates are tasteless and odorless, and are often the first sign of deterioration of groundwater quality. Nitrates are a health threat because they can cause "blue baby syndrome" and may function as initiators of human carcinogenesis. Nitrates are also an environmental threat because they cause eutrophication damage to surface water aquatic environments in the Bitterroot River.

Category

Life Sciences

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Apr 27th, 9:00 AM Apr 27th, 9:20 AM

Establishing groundwater Nitrate/Nitrite levels in Hamilton, MT

UC 330

We propose to collect emergent groundwater around Hamilton, using standardized collection methods that include quality assurance and control samples with analysis performed at a certified drinking water testing laboratory (Energy Labs). Nitrate background in natural groundwater systems should contain less than 1 mg/L nitrates (U.S. Geologic Survey) but in our aquifer, nitrates/nitrites should be less than 0.25 mg/L based on previous sampling.

We will map the locations of the samples and use local hydrology data to help determine the source and flow direction of the groundwater. Routine testing and reporting of groundwater quality in our community will help protect our health and the economy of our river. Groundwater in sand and gravel aquifers from shallow wells supplies all the Hamilton area drinking water.

The aquifers receive recharge from streams and ditches flowing in from the sides of the valley and the shallow aquifers discharge to the Bitterroot River and to ditches that flow past the west and north edge of Hamilton. We plan to collect about a dozen samples in an arc around the down gradient edge of Hamilton from these groundwater discharges.

Nitrates are tasteless and odorless, and are often the first sign of deterioration of groundwater quality. Nitrates are a health threat because they can cause "blue baby syndrome" and may function as initiators of human carcinogenesis. Nitrates are also an environmental threat because they cause eutrophication damage to surface water aquatic environments in the Bitterroot River.