Presentation Type

Poster

Faculty Mentor’s Full Name

David Burkhart

Faculty Mentor’s Department

Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Abstract

In 2016, over 10.4 million people contracted Tuberculosis (TB) infections for the first time, resulting in the deaths of 1.7 million people worldwide. Despite the existence of a vaccine, TB remains the number one cause of death from a single infectious disease according to the 2017 report from the World Health Organization. As a result, research and development of a new TB vaccine is ongoing, as it is suspected the currently available formulation does not contain an adjuvant which produces the necessary TH-17 response. In the search for new drugs to combat this epidemic, knowledge of how a compound triggers an immune response is paramount. One method for identifying an activated immune protein complex is via immunoprecipitation, colloquially referred to as a “pulldown.”

In this study, a pelletable, beaded support of polystyrene (PS) with surface-absorbed trehalose diester (TDE) has been developed for use as a tool for identification of C-type lectin receptors. TDE was used as a stand-in for trehalose dimycolate, a glycolipid found in the cell wall of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which is recognized by C-type lectin. Confirmation of surface-absorption and characterization of the modified beads was performed via dynamic light scattering and high-performance liquid chromatography.

Category

Health and Medical Science

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Apr 27th, 11:00 AM Apr 27th, 12:00 PM

Polystyrene Surface-Absorbed Trehalose Diester as a Means for Performing Pulldown Assays

UC South Ballroom

In 2016, over 10.4 million people contracted Tuberculosis (TB) infections for the first time, resulting in the deaths of 1.7 million people worldwide. Despite the existence of a vaccine, TB remains the number one cause of death from a single infectious disease according to the 2017 report from the World Health Organization. As a result, research and development of a new TB vaccine is ongoing, as it is suspected the currently available formulation does not contain an adjuvant which produces the necessary TH-17 response. In the search for new drugs to combat this epidemic, knowledge of how a compound triggers an immune response is paramount. One method for identifying an activated immune protein complex is via immunoprecipitation, colloquially referred to as a “pulldown.”

In this study, a pelletable, beaded support of polystyrene (PS) with surface-absorbed trehalose diester (TDE) has been developed for use as a tool for identification of C-type lectin receptors. TDE was used as a stand-in for trehalose dimycolate, a glycolipid found in the cell wall of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which is recognized by C-type lectin. Confirmation of surface-absorption and characterization of the modified beads was performed via dynamic light scattering and high-performance liquid chromatography.