Authors

Sophie Nowicki, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland
Robert A. Bindschadler, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MarylandFollow
Ayako Abe-Ouchi, University of Tokyo - Kashiwa, Chiba, JapanFollow
Andy Aschwanden, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AlaskaFollow
Ed Bueler, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AlaskaFollow
Hyeungu Choi, Sigma Space Corporation, Lanham, Maryland
Jim Fastook, University of Maine, Orono, Maine
Glen Granzow, University of Montana - MissoulaFollow
Ralf Greve, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, JapanFollow
Gail Gutowski, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TexasFollow
Ute Herzfeld, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado
Charles Jackson, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TexasFollow
Jesse Johnson, University of Montana - MissoulaFollow
Constantine Khroulev, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AlaskaFollow
Eric Larour, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California
Anders Levermann, Potsdam University, Potsdam, Germany
William Lipscomb, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New MexicoFollow
Maria A. Martin, Potsdam Institute for Climate Research, Potsdam, GermanyFollow
Mathieu Morlighem, University of California - Irvine, Irvine, CaliforniaFollow
Byron R. Parizek, Penn State DuBois, College Place, DuBois PennsylvaniaFollow
David Pollard, Pennsylvania State University - University Park, PAFollow
Stephen F. Price, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New MexicoFollow
Diandong Ren, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, AustraliaFollow
Eric Rignot, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California
Fuyuki Saito, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokohama, JapanFollow
Tatsuru Sato, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan
Hakime Seddik, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan
Helene Seroussi, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California
Kunio Takahashi, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokohama, Japan
Ryan Walker, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MarylandFollow
Wei Li Wang, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MarylandFollow

Document Type

Article

Publication Title

Journal of Geophysical Research : Earth Surface

Publisher

American Geophysical Union

Publication Date

6-12-2013

Abstract

Atmospheric, oceanic, and subglacial forcing scenarios from the Sea-level Response tovIce Sheet Evolution (SeaRISE) project are applied to six three-dimensional thermomechanical ice-sheet models to assess Antarctic ice sheet sensitivity over a 500 year timescale and to inform future modeling and field studies. Results indicate (i) growth with warming, except within low-latitude basins (where inland thickening is outpaced by marginal thinning); (ii) mass loss with enhanced sliding (with basins dominated by high driving stresses affected more than basins with low-surface-slope streaming ice); and (iii) mass loss with enhanced ice shelf melting (with changes in West Antarctica dominating the signal due to its marine setting and extensive ice shelves; cf. minimal impact in the Terre Adelie, George V, Oates, and Victoria Land region of East Antarctica). Ice loss due to dynamic changes associated with enhanced sliding and/or subshelf melting exceeds the gain due to increased precipitation. Furthermore, differences in results between and within basins as well as the controlling impact of sub-shelf melting on ice dynamics highlight the need for improved understanding of basal conditions, grounding-zone processes, ocean-ice interactions, and the numerical representation of all three.

DOI

10.1002/jgrf.20081

Rights

2013

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