Presentation Title

Privilege, Marginalization, and Drag Communities

Authors' Names

Dustin SatterfieldFollow

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Area of Focus

Social Sciences

Abstract

Subcultures within the queer community have formed around drag show events, especially amongst performers. Drag shows are often a beacon for a safe space that is open to all members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, queer, questioning, and asexual (LGBT+ or queer) community. Even as a safe place, drag communities may be unable to escape the pervasive oppressions of the larger society. Male privilege is present in American society through social, economic and political rights and benefits provided to men on the basis of their gender. It might be expected that the queer community would be more aware of sexism and oppression as a group that faces marginalization as well and would work to counter this marginalization. While drag communities have been researched in some contexts, male privilege and female marginalization in these communities has not.

Utilizing a questionnaire, I asked drag performers to share their experiences to learn about privilege, marginalization and drag communities in the United States. I wanted to answer the following questions: do drag communities recognize and work to undermine male privilege or is male privilege rampant throughout drag shows and communities? Additionally, what effects does the presence of male privilege have on the marginalization of women in this community? A small sample of performers was able to help me answer these questions and learn more about drag communities in the United States.

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Apr 18th, 10:30 AM Apr 18th, 10:50 AM

Privilege, Marginalization, and Drag Communities

UC 327

Subcultures within the queer community have formed around drag show events, especially amongst performers. Drag shows are often a beacon for a safe space that is open to all members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, queer, questioning, and asexual (LGBT+ or queer) community. Even as a safe place, drag communities may be unable to escape the pervasive oppressions of the larger society. Male privilege is present in American society through social, economic and political rights and benefits provided to men on the basis of their gender. It might be expected that the queer community would be more aware of sexism and oppression as a group that faces marginalization as well and would work to counter this marginalization. While drag communities have been researched in some contexts, male privilege and female marginalization in these communities has not.

Utilizing a questionnaire, I asked drag performers to share their experiences to learn about privilege, marginalization and drag communities in the United States. I wanted to answer the following questions: do drag communities recognize and work to undermine male privilege or is male privilege rampant throughout drag shows and communities? Additionally, what effects does the presence of male privilege have on the marginalization of women in this community? A small sample of performers was able to help me answer these questions and learn more about drag communities in the United States.