Presentation Title

Synthesis and Characterization of Novel Glucaric Acid-Based Hydrogels

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Research targeting the production and potential uses for glucaric acid has seen increased attention due to a 2004 US Department of Energy report naming it one of twelve "Top Value Added Chemicals from Biomass". Glucaric acid can be produced through a one-step oxidation of glucose and its salt forms are currently being utilized in applications such as water treatment and as sequestering agents. One relatively unexplored area of immense potential for glucaric acid is in the production of biobased, nylon-like polymers. These biodegradable poly(glucaramide)s are of interest due to their ability to form hydrogels at low polymer concentrations. The gels appear to form via a network of polymer nanoparticles which aggregate to create the three-dimensional gel structure when above the minimum gelation concentration, as indicated by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The rheological characterization indicates that the poly(glucaramide) hydrogels are thermoreversible and can gel in a wide range of environments. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that these novel materials could have potential applications as controlled release systems.

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Apr 27th, 10:00 AM Apr 27th, 10:15 AM

Synthesis and Characterization of Novel Glucaric Acid-Based Hydrogels

UC Ballroom, Pod #1

Research targeting the production and potential uses for glucaric acid has seen increased attention due to a 2004 US Department of Energy report naming it one of twelve "Top Value Added Chemicals from Biomass". Glucaric acid can be produced through a one-step oxidation of glucose and its salt forms are currently being utilized in applications such as water treatment and as sequestering agents. One relatively unexplored area of immense potential for glucaric acid is in the production of biobased, nylon-like polymers. These biodegradable poly(glucaramide)s are of interest due to their ability to form hydrogels at low polymer concentrations. The gels appear to form via a network of polymer nanoparticles which aggregate to create the three-dimensional gel structure when above the minimum gelation concentration, as indicated by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The rheological characterization indicates that the poly(glucaramide) hydrogels are thermoreversible and can gel in a wide range of environments. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that these novel materials could have potential applications as controlled release systems.