Presentation Title

Assessment of Concussion Knowledge in Youth Sports Participants and their Parents

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Context: The Dylan Steigers Protection of Youth Athletes Act (DSPYAA) was passed by Montana legislature in 2013 as the state’s first concussion law. Calling for mandatory concussion education of coaches, parents, and athletes, this law only applies to school sponsored sports, excluding those involved in youth sports organizations (YSO), such as youth soccer, youth hockey and youth football. Currently, it is up to the YSO to provide concussion education, if any, to its participants.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess concussion knowledge in youth athletes and their parents participating in YSO specifically focusing on sports that are at higher risk for concussions.

Design: Cross sectional survey.

Setting: A descriptive questionnaire was distributed to youth sports participants and their parents at football, soccer and ice hockey practices.

Participants: Convenience sampling resulted in 101 athletes, with an average age of 11 + 1.3 years, and 209 parents with an average age of 41.9 + 7.1 years. Due to the convenience sample technique, a response rate could not be obtained.

Interventions: The researchers combined and modified two existing validated surveys containing closed ended questions about concussion knowledge and consequences of concussions, as well as if they had received formal or informal concussion education. The survey distributed was titled Concussion Knowledge in Youth Sports Participants and Their Parents in Western Montana.

Main Outcome Measures: Quantitative data from the questionnaire was analyzed using Microsoft Excel. Composite scores were calculated for concussion knowledge and consequences questions by adding the total possible correct signs/symptoms and consequences and awarding 1 point for each correctly identified minus 1 point for each distractor selected. Total possible points on the survey were 22.

Results: The average composite scores on the concussion knowledge survey for athletes were: youth soccer 8.07 + 3.44, football 8.26 + 3.64, and hockey 10.50 + 3.48. The average composite scores for the parents were: youth soccer 12.38 + 2.80, football 12.69 + 2.92 and hockey 13.32 + 2.59. More than 50% of parents and athletes surveyed reported they had discussed the consequences of concussion with each other. Less than 50% of parents and athletes surveyed reported they had formal education about concussions.

Conclusions: Athletes scored well below previously reported composite scores of 16 on this survey, indicating a poor ability to recognize concussion symptoms and long-term consequences. Of note, both parents and athletes were not able to correctly identify the distractors related to concussion signs and symptoms and half of both groups were unable to tease out the distractors related to long term consequences. Future implementation of concussion education programs for these organizations is highly suggested.

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Apr 27th, 11:00 AM Apr 27th, 12:00 PM

Assessment of Concussion Knowledge in Youth Sports Participants and their Parents

UC Ballroom (Center)

Context: The Dylan Steigers Protection of Youth Athletes Act (DSPYAA) was passed by Montana legislature in 2013 as the state’s first concussion law. Calling for mandatory concussion education of coaches, parents, and athletes, this law only applies to school sponsored sports, excluding those involved in youth sports organizations (YSO), such as youth soccer, youth hockey and youth football. Currently, it is up to the YSO to provide concussion education, if any, to its participants.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess concussion knowledge in youth athletes and their parents participating in YSO specifically focusing on sports that are at higher risk for concussions.

Design: Cross sectional survey.

Setting: A descriptive questionnaire was distributed to youth sports participants and their parents at football, soccer and ice hockey practices.

Participants: Convenience sampling resulted in 101 athletes, with an average age of 11 + 1.3 years, and 209 parents with an average age of 41.9 + 7.1 years. Due to the convenience sample technique, a response rate could not be obtained.

Interventions: The researchers combined and modified two existing validated surveys containing closed ended questions about concussion knowledge and consequences of concussions, as well as if they had received formal or informal concussion education. The survey distributed was titled Concussion Knowledge in Youth Sports Participants and Their Parents in Western Montana.

Main Outcome Measures: Quantitative data from the questionnaire was analyzed using Microsoft Excel. Composite scores were calculated for concussion knowledge and consequences questions by adding the total possible correct signs/symptoms and consequences and awarding 1 point for each correctly identified minus 1 point for each distractor selected. Total possible points on the survey were 22.

Results: The average composite scores on the concussion knowledge survey for athletes were: youth soccer 8.07 + 3.44, football 8.26 + 3.64, and hockey 10.50 + 3.48. The average composite scores for the parents were: youth soccer 12.38 + 2.80, football 12.69 + 2.92 and hockey 13.32 + 2.59. More than 50% of parents and athletes surveyed reported they had discussed the consequences of concussion with each other. Less than 50% of parents and athletes surveyed reported they had formal education about concussions.

Conclusions: Athletes scored well below previously reported composite scores of 16 on this survey, indicating a poor ability to recognize concussion symptoms and long-term consequences. Of note, both parents and athletes were not able to correctly identify the distractors related to concussion signs and symptoms and half of both groups were unable to tease out the distractors related to long term consequences. Future implementation of concussion education programs for these organizations is highly suggested.