Document Type

Article

Publication Title

Journal of American College Health

Publisher

Taylor & Francis Group

Publication Date

2012

Abstract

Objective

This pilot study examined smoking reduction and cessation among college smokers with elevated depressive symptomatology participating in a group-based behavioral counseling, mood management, and motivational enhancement combined intervention (CBT).

Participants & Methods

Fifty-eight smokers (smoked ≥ 6 days in the past 30) were randomized to six sessions of CBT (n=29) or a nutrition-focused attention-matched control group (CG, n=29).

Results

Relative to CG participants, significantly more CBT participants reduced smoking intensity by 50% (χ2(1, N=58)=4.86, p=.028) at end of treatment. Although CBT participants maintained smoking reductions at 3- and 6-month follow-up, group differences were no longer significant. No group differences in cessation emerged. Finally, participants in both groups evidenced increased motivation to reduce smoking at end of treatment (F(1, 44)=11.717, p=.001, ηp2=.207).

Conclusions

Findings demonstrate the utility of this intervention for smoking reduction and maintenance of reductions over time among a population of college students with elevated depressive symptomatology.

DOI

10.1080/07448481.2011.567403

Comments

This is an Author’s Accepted Manuscript of an article published in the Journal of American College Health 2012, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07448481.2011.567403

Rights

©2012 Taylor & Francis Group

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