Title

THE EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION ON MEASURES OF ANAEROBIC PERFORMANCE

Presenter Information

Allison Harney

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Although alcohol is widely researched for its psychological and physiological effects on performance, past research has focused on aerobic modes. Therefore, we aimed to determine the effects of acute alcohol ingestion on tests of anaerobic performance. Twenty five subjects (13 female, 12 male, 22 ± 3 yrs, 173 ± 12 cm, 70 ± 17 kg, VO2 max 45 ± 8 ml/kg/min) were tested in a randomized crossover design, once consuming a placebo (6.4 ml/kg orange juice for females and 7.9 ml /kg for males) and once consuming 80 proof alcohol (2.6 ml/kg alcohol + 5.3 ml/kg orange juice for males and 2.1 ml/kg alcohol + 4.3 ml/kg juice for females) to achieve a 0.06% blood alcohol content as measured with a breathalyzer. Drinks were administered at 0, 15, and 30 minutes. Tests included a one repetition maximum (RM) bench press, vertical jump, two-minute crunches, and 30 second Wingate. Results indicated a significant decrease with alcohol consumption vs. placebo in average mean power (539 ± 168 vs. 556 ± 179 watts, alcohol and placebo, respectively, p<0.01) as well as average minimum power (384 ± 129 and 405 ± 131 watts, alcohol and placebo, respectively, p<0.01) during the Wingate. There was no difference between trials in the bench press, vertical jump, crunches, or Wingate peak power. These data suggest short duration (<15 seconds) or low intensity (i.e. crunches) activities are less influenced by alcohol than sustained high intensity activities. Further research is needed to elucidate the effect of alcohol on sustained anaerobic power.

Category

Life Sciences

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Apr 15th, 4:00 PM Apr 15th, 4:20 PM

THE EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION ON MEASURES OF ANAEROBIC PERFORMANCE

UC 326

Although alcohol is widely researched for its psychological and physiological effects on performance, past research has focused on aerobic modes. Therefore, we aimed to determine the effects of acute alcohol ingestion on tests of anaerobic performance. Twenty five subjects (13 female, 12 male, 22 ± 3 yrs, 173 ± 12 cm, 70 ± 17 kg, VO2 max 45 ± 8 ml/kg/min) were tested in a randomized crossover design, once consuming a placebo (6.4 ml/kg orange juice for females and 7.9 ml /kg for males) and once consuming 80 proof alcohol (2.6 ml/kg alcohol + 5.3 ml/kg orange juice for males and 2.1 ml/kg alcohol + 4.3 ml/kg juice for females) to achieve a 0.06% blood alcohol content as measured with a breathalyzer. Drinks were administered at 0, 15, and 30 minutes. Tests included a one repetition maximum (RM) bench press, vertical jump, two-minute crunches, and 30 second Wingate. Results indicated a significant decrease with alcohol consumption vs. placebo in average mean power (539 ± 168 vs. 556 ± 179 watts, alcohol and placebo, respectively, p<0.01) as well as average minimum power (384 ± 129 and 405 ± 131 watts, alcohol and placebo, respectively, p<0.01) during the Wingate. There was no difference between trials in the bench press, vertical jump, crunches, or Wingate peak power. These data suggest short duration (<15 seconds) or low intensity (i.e. crunches) activities are less influenced by alcohol than sustained high intensity activities. Further research is needed to elucidate the effect of alcohol on sustained anaerobic power.