Title

GENETIC COMPONENTS OF PREDICTING DRUG ADVERSE REACTIONS IN THE CONFEDERATED SALISH AND KOOTENAI TRIBAL POPULATION

Presenter Information

Casey Cable

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

American Indians represent a medically underserved population in terms of access to and quality of healthcare. Knowledge of the population frequencies of those who carry specific risk genotypes, making them more likely to have an adverse drug reaction, is typically based on studies in predominantly non-American Indian populations. A number of population genetic factors, such as admixture, genetic drift and migration, can skew the distribution of allele frequencies in any one ethnic or cultural group, causing an elevated proportion of individuals with the risk genotype. In this study, we assessed the variant allele frequency for 18 loci that are used to predict patient outcomes in frontline cancer chemotherapy. We collected blood samples from a group of Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribal (CSKT) individuals and transported the samples to the University of Monatana laboratories where DNA was isolated from whole blood using the QiaAMP Midi Kit from Qiagen (Valencia, CA). An aliquot of purified DNA was then shipped to the laboratory of Dr. Matt Ames at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN for genotyping. The results showed that several loci exhibited variant allele frequencies that were significantly different from Caucasian, or other ethnic populations, confirming that the CSKT population is genetically distinct and has a unique set of pharmacogenomic risks.

Category

Life Sciences

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Apr 15th, 4:00 PM Apr 15th, 4:20 PM

GENETIC COMPONENTS OF PREDICTING DRUG ADVERSE REACTIONS IN THE CONFEDERATED SALISH AND KOOTENAI TRIBAL POPULATION

UC 327

American Indians represent a medically underserved population in terms of access to and quality of healthcare. Knowledge of the population frequencies of those who carry specific risk genotypes, making them more likely to have an adverse drug reaction, is typically based on studies in predominantly non-American Indian populations. A number of population genetic factors, such as admixture, genetic drift and migration, can skew the distribution of allele frequencies in any one ethnic or cultural group, causing an elevated proportion of individuals with the risk genotype. In this study, we assessed the variant allele frequency for 18 loci that are used to predict patient outcomes in frontline cancer chemotherapy. We collected blood samples from a group of Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribal (CSKT) individuals and transported the samples to the University of Monatana laboratories where DNA was isolated from whole blood using the QiaAMP Midi Kit from Qiagen (Valencia, CA). An aliquot of purified DNA was then shipped to the laboratory of Dr. Matt Ames at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN for genotyping. The results showed that several loci exhibited variant allele frequencies that were significantly different from Caucasian, or other ethnic populations, confirming that the CSKT population is genetically distinct and has a unique set of pharmacogenomic risks.