Title

COMPARING THE EFFECTS OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC STRETCHING ROUTINES ON SHOULDER RANGE OF MOTION AND PERFORMANCE

Presenter Information

Karis Hawkins

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Historically, it has been thought that stretching prior to exercise reduces or helps prevent injuries. Most active individuals were taught to stretch statically before and after exercise. Recent research indicates that athletes who use a dynamic warm up before their events outperform athletes who use a static stretch. However, the existing literature is inconclusive and very little research has been conducted on the upper extremity. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a significant difference in using a dynamic or static warm up to increase shoulder range of motion and performance. This study included 16 healthy individuals (21.2 + 2.6 years) who partook in a dynamic stretching, static stretching, or control session once a week over a three week period. Prior to, and upon completion of every session, each subject performed range of motion testing and a closed kinetic chain upper extremity test (CKCUE test). The CKCUE test is a performance and functional test to asses return to play. Our results indicate that external rotation of the shoulder and the performance test both had improvements in both dynamic and static stretching routines. We anticipate that this research will be of great value to clinicians in a variety of rehabilitation settings by helping them make an informed decision in determining the appropriate mode of warm up for their patients.

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Apr 15th, 11:00 AM Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

COMPARING THE EFFECTS OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC STRETCHING ROUTINES ON SHOULDER RANGE OF MOTION AND PERFORMANCE

UC South Ballroom

Historically, it has been thought that stretching prior to exercise reduces or helps prevent injuries. Most active individuals were taught to stretch statically before and after exercise. Recent research indicates that athletes who use a dynamic warm up before their events outperform athletes who use a static stretch. However, the existing literature is inconclusive and very little research has been conducted on the upper extremity. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a significant difference in using a dynamic or static warm up to increase shoulder range of motion and performance. This study included 16 healthy individuals (21.2 + 2.6 years) who partook in a dynamic stretching, static stretching, or control session once a week over a three week period. Prior to, and upon completion of every session, each subject performed range of motion testing and a closed kinetic chain upper extremity test (CKCUE test). The CKCUE test is a performance and functional test to asses return to play. Our results indicate that external rotation of the shoulder and the performance test both had improvements in both dynamic and static stretching routines. We anticipate that this research will be of great value to clinicians in a variety of rehabilitation settings by helping them make an informed decision in determining the appropriate mode of warm up for their patients.