Title

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Age of Diagnosis, Medication Efficacy, and Performance on the Stroop Color-Word Interference Test

Presenter Information

Hannah Wadsworth

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

ADHD is a commonly diagnosed childhood disorder that begins early in life (3%-7% before age 7). It can be a diagnosis that perseveres throughout the lifespan. Early diagnosis is important because it leads to early interventions that help the individual adapt to ADHD. Though efficacy of pharmacological approaches can be variable, they remain the primary and most effective treatment for ADHD. Two key variables in the treatment are age of diagnosis and medication effects. Currently, the most common techniques used to diagnose ADHD are rating scales and cognitive testing. Our labs recent data suggests that the Stroop Color-Word test (Stroop) is particularly effective in identifying individuals with ADHD. The Stroop is a task where color words are printed in different colored ink. The participant is asked to name the color of the ink rather than read the word. The research will examine the relationship between age of diagnosis and subjective rating of medication efficacy on performance on the Stroop. Students identified as having a diagnosis of ADHD will complete questionnaires regarding their age of diagnosis and how effective their medication is at improving their attention. They will then complete a brief battery of tests including the Stroop. When comparing age of diagnosis and medication effectiveness the expected result is that the earlier the age of diagnosis, the better the participant’s rating of medication efficacy. Another expected result is that an earlier age of diagnosis will be associated with increased scores on the Stroop. It is expected that higher ratings of medication efficacy will be associated with better performance on the Stroop. Data collection is ongoing. This research is important because it will give further evidence supporting an early diagnosis in order to implement an early treatment and give the individual the time and skills to adapt to their diagnosis.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 13th, 11:00 AM Apr 13th, 12:00 PM

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Age of Diagnosis, Medication Efficacy, and Performance on the Stroop Color-Word Interference Test

UC Ballroom

ADHD is a commonly diagnosed childhood disorder that begins early in life (3%-7% before age 7). It can be a diagnosis that perseveres throughout the lifespan. Early diagnosis is important because it leads to early interventions that help the individual adapt to ADHD. Though efficacy of pharmacological approaches can be variable, they remain the primary and most effective treatment for ADHD. Two key variables in the treatment are age of diagnosis and medication effects. Currently, the most common techniques used to diagnose ADHD are rating scales and cognitive testing. Our labs recent data suggests that the Stroop Color-Word test (Stroop) is particularly effective in identifying individuals with ADHD. The Stroop is a task where color words are printed in different colored ink. The participant is asked to name the color of the ink rather than read the word. The research will examine the relationship between age of diagnosis and subjective rating of medication efficacy on performance on the Stroop. Students identified as having a diagnosis of ADHD will complete questionnaires regarding their age of diagnosis and how effective their medication is at improving their attention. They will then complete a brief battery of tests including the Stroop. When comparing age of diagnosis and medication effectiveness the expected result is that the earlier the age of diagnosis, the better the participant’s rating of medication efficacy. Another expected result is that an earlier age of diagnosis will be associated with increased scores on the Stroop. It is expected that higher ratings of medication efficacy will be associated with better performance on the Stroop. Data collection is ongoing. This research is important because it will give further evidence supporting an early diagnosis in order to implement an early treatment and give the individual the time and skills to adapt to their diagnosis.