Title

Metacognition and allocation of study time following a traumatic brain injury

Presenter Information

Sarah Flanary

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Prior research has shown that patients who have experienced traumatic brain injuries often have a more difficult time studying and learning after the injury, due to changes in their metacognition. My purpose with this project was to design and implement a study to learn more about these differences and compare them to non-injured individuals. I will be focusing on the metacognitive skills of adults who have experienced TBI?s and how these skills affect their allocation of study time and subsequent learning experiences. My study will give information on various aspects of their personal studying and learning habits. These include personal judgments of learning, how they allocate their study time, and how well they do learning with a time limit. I will be comparing their results to the Region of Proximal Learning Model (Metcalfe and Kendall, 2005), which is used to describe non-injured individuals study habits. I am hoping to gather information to assist in the development of more effective studying strategies for individuals who have experienced traumatic brain injuries.

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Apr 13th, 11:00 AM Apr 13th, 12:00 PM

Metacognition and allocation of study time following a traumatic brain injury

UC Ballroom

Prior research has shown that patients who have experienced traumatic brain injuries often have a more difficult time studying and learning after the injury, due to changes in their metacognition. My purpose with this project was to design and implement a study to learn more about these differences and compare them to non-injured individuals. I will be focusing on the metacognitive skills of adults who have experienced TBI?s and how these skills affect their allocation of study time and subsequent learning experiences. My study will give information on various aspects of their personal studying and learning habits. These include personal judgments of learning, how they allocate their study time, and how well they do learning with a time limit. I will be comparing their results to the Region of Proximal Learning Model (Metcalfe and Kendall, 2005), which is used to describe non-injured individuals study habits. I am hoping to gather information to assist in the development of more effective studying strategies for individuals who have experienced traumatic brain injuries.