Title

Description of the "noise notch" in noise-induced hearing loss

Presenter Information

Raquel Moes

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is the second most common form of sensorineural hearing deficit, after presbycusis (age-related hearing loss). Many Americans are exposed to potentially harmful sound levels in their work places and also during recreational activity that they may pursue. Hearing loss caused by exposure to recreational and occupational noise results in devastating disability that is virtually 100 percent preventable. NIHL is easily determined by a specific loss in hearing at 3000, 4000 or 6000 Hz. The pattern of the loss produces a decrement of hearing at one of those frequencies and improves in adjacent frequencies. This has be described from a diagnostic perspective as a "noise notch." In hearing testing usually only octave frequencies of 250- 8000 Hz are tested, the precise frequency and the decibel loss at the frequency of the notch is not known. This research determined the nearly exact frequency of the noise notch and the notch depth in terms of the decibel loss. Subjects were presented tonal signals and responded behaviorally. A computer presented each pure tone at the octave frequencies and determined a decrement at the noise notch. A binary search procedure was then utilized to further divide the frequency spectrum to determine the parameters of the noise notch. This process was repeated to a resolution of 10Hz. This will be significant information that will aid in our understanding of this disorder of the auditory system and will be of benefit in providing audiological rehabilitation such as providing hearing aids.

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Apr 13th, 11:00 AM Apr 13th, 12:00 PM

Description of the "noise notch" in noise-induced hearing loss

UC Ballroom

Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is the second most common form of sensorineural hearing deficit, after presbycusis (age-related hearing loss). Many Americans are exposed to potentially harmful sound levels in their work places and also during recreational activity that they may pursue. Hearing loss caused by exposure to recreational and occupational noise results in devastating disability that is virtually 100 percent preventable. NIHL is easily determined by a specific loss in hearing at 3000, 4000 or 6000 Hz. The pattern of the loss produces a decrement of hearing at one of those frequencies and improves in adjacent frequencies. This has be described from a diagnostic perspective as a "noise notch." In hearing testing usually only octave frequencies of 250- 8000 Hz are tested, the precise frequency and the decibel loss at the frequency of the notch is not known. This research determined the nearly exact frequency of the noise notch and the notch depth in terms of the decibel loss. Subjects were presented tonal signals and responded behaviorally. A computer presented each pure tone at the octave frequencies and determined a decrement at the noise notch. A binary search procedure was then utilized to further divide the frequency spectrum to determine the parameters of the noise notch. This process was repeated to a resolution of 10Hz. This will be significant information that will aid in our understanding of this disorder of the auditory system and will be of benefit in providing audiological rehabilitation such as providing hearing aids.