Title

Causal factors that contribute to the low graduation rate of Native American students at The University of Montana

Presenter Information

Myron Gardipee
Eagle-Heart Thomas

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

In today’s higher education system, there is a broad and diverse population of students who attend college. In the Montana University System 2009 Diversity Report, only 9% of incoming freshman identified as Native American (NA) has graduated within 6 years with a Baccalaureate degree. These statistics demonstrate that 1 out of 10Native American students who began at The University of Montana will graduate with a Baccalaureate degree within six years. The purpose of this study is to look for related causal factors associated with low graduation rates. The aim of the study is not to find a solution for the dropout problem, but to answer the question: Why would an individual make such a big commitment both in terms of time and money, only to quit before they graduate? A 25 question survey will be administered 50 American Indian students and to 50 psychology 100 students. Significant differences between groups are expected. The results that are expected may show that the NA sample will experience higher levels of stress, discrimination, and lower levels of social support.

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Apr 13th, 3:00 PM Apr 13th, 4:00 PM

Causal factors that contribute to the low graduation rate of Native American students at The University of Montana

UC Ballroom

In today’s higher education system, there is a broad and diverse population of students who attend college. In the Montana University System 2009 Diversity Report, only 9% of incoming freshman identified as Native American (NA) has graduated within 6 years with a Baccalaureate degree. These statistics demonstrate that 1 out of 10Native American students who began at The University of Montana will graduate with a Baccalaureate degree within six years. The purpose of this study is to look for related causal factors associated with low graduation rates. The aim of the study is not to find a solution for the dropout problem, but to answer the question: Why would an individual make such a big commitment both in terms of time and money, only to quit before they graduate? A 25 question survey will be administered 50 American Indian students and to 50 psychology 100 students. Significant differences between groups are expected. The results that are expected may show that the NA sample will experience higher levels of stress, discrimination, and lower levels of social support.