Title

Alzheimer's Disease: Maintaining Dignity & Quality of Life

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S with currently over 5 million American’s diagnosed. Among the top ten causes of death in the U.S., it is the only disease that cannot be prevented, cured, or even slowed. In this presentation I will begin by discussing the basics of Alzheimer’s disease: cause, diagnosis, and treatment. Although there is much research going on, even on our own campus to try to solve this mystery disease, there are over 21,000 people suffering from Alzheimer’s disease right now in Montana that will never find a way out of their confusion. The second half of my presentation will discuss behavioral strategies that I have obtained from literature on behavioral studies, discussions of behaviors in various caregiver support groups, and in online blogs for Alzheimer’s caregivers. In the last year I have implemented and found these strategies to be successful in decreasing anxiety and increasing quality of life while working at a facility that specializes in memory care. I will highlight on key times of the day that I have found are common sources of stress for people with Alzheimer’s including meal times, bathing, and everyday downtime. By implementing verbal and physical cues for behavior, I have seen anxiety and confusion decrease for the people I serve. Through small moments of recognition, calming activities, and social interactions I believe that we can provide a better day for a person living with Alzheimer’s disease.

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Apr 12th, 10:20 AM Apr 12th, 10:40 AM

Alzheimer's Disease: Maintaining Dignity & Quality of Life

UC 327

Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S with currently over 5 million American’s diagnosed. Among the top ten causes of death in the U.S., it is the only disease that cannot be prevented, cured, or even slowed. In this presentation I will begin by discussing the basics of Alzheimer’s disease: cause, diagnosis, and treatment. Although there is much research going on, even on our own campus to try to solve this mystery disease, there are over 21,000 people suffering from Alzheimer’s disease right now in Montana that will never find a way out of their confusion. The second half of my presentation will discuss behavioral strategies that I have obtained from literature on behavioral studies, discussions of behaviors in various caregiver support groups, and in online blogs for Alzheimer’s caregivers. In the last year I have implemented and found these strategies to be successful in decreasing anxiety and increasing quality of life while working at a facility that specializes in memory care. I will highlight on key times of the day that I have found are common sources of stress for people with Alzheimer’s including meal times, bathing, and everyday downtime. By implementing verbal and physical cues for behavior, I have seen anxiety and confusion decrease for the people I serve. Through small moments of recognition, calming activities, and social interactions I believe that we can provide a better day for a person living with Alzheimer’s disease.