Title

Personality and Recreation Preferences

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

The author proposes that personality traits shape our motivations which in turn influence choices to participate or abstain from participation in particular outdoor recreation activities. Through a quantitative survey, the relationship between an individual's personality type and their preference for certain outdoor recreation activities has been explored. To understand personality types, the Big-Five framework has ben used. This framework is a well established psychological model designed to distill an individual's personality predispositions into a five-part score. Participants have been asked to indicate the level of interest in participating in each outdoor activity provided in a list, as well as their perceived level of risk involving each activity. Finally, a series of Recreation Experience Preference items was used to understand expressed motivations of participation outdoor activities in general. This study has compared survey respondent's personality types to their motivations and preferences for outdoor activities to determine if any correlation exists between these factors and what role risk may play in their preferences.

While motivations in recreation have been studied in the past, recently developed personality frameworks provide a new opportunity to assess the connections between an individual’s enduring personality traits and their preferences for leisure. No prior research has been conducted on this subject, in this way. If a significant correlation is evident between activity preferences and personality traits, recreation professionals may be able to utilize personality frameworks to improve activity design of specific programs in satisfying the needs of those participating. This study will also help programmers understand the unique developmental needs of those most likely to participate, and perhaps alter programs to make them more attractive and valuable to groups with low occurrences of participation. If a significant correlation is not evident, then further research exploring the nature of recreation drivers and constraints may be suggested.

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Apr 12th, 3:00 PM Apr 12th, 3:20 PM

Personality and Recreation Preferences

UC 330

The author proposes that personality traits shape our motivations which in turn influence choices to participate or abstain from participation in particular outdoor recreation activities. Through a quantitative survey, the relationship between an individual's personality type and their preference for certain outdoor recreation activities has been explored. To understand personality types, the Big-Five framework has ben used. This framework is a well established psychological model designed to distill an individual's personality predispositions into a five-part score. Participants have been asked to indicate the level of interest in participating in each outdoor activity provided in a list, as well as their perceived level of risk involving each activity. Finally, a series of Recreation Experience Preference items was used to understand expressed motivations of participation outdoor activities in general. This study has compared survey respondent's personality types to their motivations and preferences for outdoor activities to determine if any correlation exists between these factors and what role risk may play in their preferences.

While motivations in recreation have been studied in the past, recently developed personality frameworks provide a new opportunity to assess the connections between an individual’s enduring personality traits and their preferences for leisure. No prior research has been conducted on this subject, in this way. If a significant correlation is evident between activity preferences and personality traits, recreation professionals may be able to utilize personality frameworks to improve activity design of specific programs in satisfying the needs of those participating. This study will also help programmers understand the unique developmental needs of those most likely to participate, and perhaps alter programs to make them more attractive and valuable to groups with low occurrences of participation. If a significant correlation is not evident, then further research exploring the nature of recreation drivers and constraints may be suggested.