Title

Metabolic and energy requirements for stand up paddleboarding

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the energy expenditure of stand up paddleboarding (SUP) and performance variations among board designs. METHODS: 24 male and female participants (23 + 6 yrs, 179 + 10 cm, 75 + 11 kg, 13 + 8% body fat) completed the study. In the laboratory, participants performed three stages of increasing intensity on an indoor paddleboard simulator, measuring heart rate, intensity (watts), and oxygen consumption, via a metabolic cart. Participants reported to the river for an initial field trial, which consisted of three time trials on a river (R), touring (T), and inflatable (I) paddleboard using a randomized crossover design. Time to complete the trials was measured, and heart rate was used to estimate oxygen consumption based on data from the laboratory. On a separate visit, participants performed a 5-minute steady-state trial on the river with a portable method for collecting expired gases.RESULTS: A significant relationship (r2=0.72, p<0.05) existed between paddling intensity (Watts) and oxygen consumption during laboratory testing, y=0.012x + 0.939. Time to complete the trials was less for R and T boards compared to I board (6.0 + 1.3, 5.9 + 1.2, and 7.0 + 1.4, respectively, p <0.05). There was a significant relationship (r2=0.89, p<0.05) between estimated and measured oxygen consumption, y=0.9801x – 0.0429. CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that board design contributes to paddling speed during SUP. The energy demand of SUP is comparable to moderate rowing, canoeing, kayaking, and vigorous swimming. This substantiates paddleboarding as a viable form aerobic exercise.

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Apr 12th, 11:00 AM Apr 12th, 12:00 PM

Metabolic and energy requirements for stand up paddleboarding

UC Ballroom

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the energy expenditure of stand up paddleboarding (SUP) and performance variations among board designs. METHODS: 24 male and female participants (23 + 6 yrs, 179 + 10 cm, 75 + 11 kg, 13 + 8% body fat) completed the study. In the laboratory, participants performed three stages of increasing intensity on an indoor paddleboard simulator, measuring heart rate, intensity (watts), and oxygen consumption, via a metabolic cart. Participants reported to the river for an initial field trial, which consisted of three time trials on a river (R), touring (T), and inflatable (I) paddleboard using a randomized crossover design. Time to complete the trials was measured, and heart rate was used to estimate oxygen consumption based on data from the laboratory. On a separate visit, participants performed a 5-minute steady-state trial on the river with a portable method for collecting expired gases.RESULTS: A significant relationship (r2=0.72, p<0.05) existed between paddling intensity (Watts) and oxygen consumption during laboratory testing, y=0.012x + 0.939. Time to complete the trials was less for R and T boards compared to I board (6.0 + 1.3, 5.9 + 1.2, and 7.0 + 1.4, respectively, p <0.05). There was a significant relationship (r2=0.89, p<0.05) between estimated and measured oxygen consumption, y=0.9801x – 0.0429. CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that board design contributes to paddling speed during SUP. The energy demand of SUP is comparable to moderate rowing, canoeing, kayaking, and vigorous swimming. This substantiates paddleboarding as a viable form aerobic exercise.