Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

The Deadliest Road: Analysis of Drunk Driving Fatalities in Montana

Social Work

Montana holds some of the most deadly roads in the country for impaired driving fatalities. This project examines Driving Under the Influence (DUI) fatalities from the perspective of incarcerated drunk drivers whose crime resulted in the death of another. Two-hour interviews were conducted with both male and female inmates from Montana State Prison in Deer Lodge, MT, the WATCH Program in Warm Springs, MT, the Women’s Prison in Billings, MT, and other Department of Corrections facilities. Inmates were asked about their personal history, specific offense, recall of the event, and what they believe would prevent others from driving under the influence. We conducted a preliminary analysis based on grounded theory of the qualitative narratives generated. Inmates’ interviews were analyzed and categorized by themes. These themes were: the relationship between the inmate and their victim, the stage of grief the inmate displayed, and their opinion on how to prevent other people from driving under the influence. The results of this study aid in understanding the implications of driving under the influence. In the future, the study and publication of these first-hand accounts can contribute greatly to the reduction of drunk driving fatalities in the state of Montana.

Category

Social Sciences

Share

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 10:20 AM Apr 11th, 10:40 AM

The Deadliest Road: Analysis of Drunk Driving Fatalities in Montana

The Deadliest Road: Analysis of Drunk Driving Fatalities in Montana

Social Work

Montana holds some of the most deadly roads in the country for impaired driving fatalities. This project examines Driving Under the Influence (DUI) fatalities from the perspective of incarcerated drunk drivers whose crime resulted in the death of another. Two-hour interviews were conducted with both male and female inmates from Montana State Prison in Deer Lodge, MT, the WATCH Program in Warm Springs, MT, the Women’s Prison in Billings, MT, and other Department of Corrections facilities. Inmates were asked about their personal history, specific offense, recall of the event, and what they believe would prevent others from driving under the influence. We conducted a preliminary analysis based on grounded theory of the qualitative narratives generated. Inmates’ interviews were analyzed and categorized by themes. These themes were: the relationship between the inmate and their victim, the stage of grief the inmate displayed, and their opinion on how to prevent other people from driving under the influence. The results of this study aid in understanding the implications of driving under the influence. In the future, the study and publication of these first-hand accounts can contribute greatly to the reduction of drunk driving fatalities in the state of Montana.