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Presentation

Abstract

Comparing the Effects of Pulsed Shortwave Diathermy and Static Stretching on Shoulder Range of Motion.

Life Sciences

The purpose of a warm-up is to physiologically prepare the body for upcoming physical work. The relative effectiveness of different modes of warm-up, however, is unknown. A common method is a passive warm-up, which is the therapeutic use of an external heat source to warm the muscles. To maximize the benefits of heating modalities, it is thought that an active warm-up such as stretching or exercises should be combined with a passive heating treatment to improve range of motion (ROM) or performance. We wanted to see how this combined technique compared to stretching or heating treatments in isolation. To assess this we took measurements of internal rotation, external rotation, posterior shoulder tightness and scapular movement before and after each treatment. The four treatments consisted of a control treatment, a static stretching routine, a deep heating treatment, and a treatment of deep heating followed by static stretching. 10 college aged students participated in the study by receiving treatments every Thursday for 4 weeks. In order to qualify, the participant took part in overhead activity at least twice a week and was free of significant shoulder injuries for at least one year. Most research in this field focuses on either a deep heating modality or a stretching routine; there is very little research directly comparing the two in combination for the shoulder. We found no statistical significance for all measurements but we did find a main effect for time for posterior shoulder tightness, meaning that all participants improved from pre to post treatment. We also found clinical relevance (an increase of 2-3°) for posterior shoulder tightness, external rotation, and internal rotation. Even though there was no statistical significance, our results show positive trends indicating that heating and stretching the posterior shoulder capsule increases range of motion.

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Physical Sciences

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Apr 11th, 9:00 AM Apr 11th, 9:20 AM

Comparing the Effects of Pulsed Shortwave Diathermy and Static Stretching on Shoulder Range of Motion.

Comparing the Effects of Pulsed Shortwave Diathermy and Static Stretching on Shoulder Range of Motion.

Life Sciences

The purpose of a warm-up is to physiologically prepare the body for upcoming physical work. The relative effectiveness of different modes of warm-up, however, is unknown. A common method is a passive warm-up, which is the therapeutic use of an external heat source to warm the muscles. To maximize the benefits of heating modalities, it is thought that an active warm-up such as stretching or exercises should be combined with a passive heating treatment to improve range of motion (ROM) or performance. We wanted to see how this combined technique compared to stretching or heating treatments in isolation. To assess this we took measurements of internal rotation, external rotation, posterior shoulder tightness and scapular movement before and after each treatment. The four treatments consisted of a control treatment, a static stretching routine, a deep heating treatment, and a treatment of deep heating followed by static stretching. 10 college aged students participated in the study by receiving treatments every Thursday for 4 weeks. In order to qualify, the participant took part in overhead activity at least twice a week and was free of significant shoulder injuries for at least one year. Most research in this field focuses on either a deep heating modality or a stretching routine; there is very little research directly comparing the two in combination for the shoulder. We found no statistical significance for all measurements but we did find a main effect for time for posterior shoulder tightness, meaning that all participants improved from pre to post treatment. We also found clinical relevance (an increase of 2-3°) for posterior shoulder tightness, external rotation, and internal rotation. Even though there was no statistical significance, our results show positive trends indicating that heating and stretching the posterior shoulder capsule increases range of motion.