Presenter Information

Michael C. WestonFollow

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

The relationship between insects, specifically the orders caddisflies (Trichoptera), moths (Lepidoptera) and mayflies (Ephemeroptera) and different wavelengths of light was studied to determine what wavelength is most attractive to these different insect orders and how they differ in their interaction with the light source. This is important information to protect beneficial insects while also helping eradicate destructive insects. This approach is different from previous studies because it is comparing orders of insects rather than grouping them all together. The first part of my research was conducted at night, by shining a flood light on a white sheet to watch how many insects landed on this sheet. I observed this sheet for 30-minute intervals and then let the insects disperse for 30 minutes before changing the wavelength. The wavelength would range from 450 nm to 750 nm, or in other words from blue to red in the visual spectrum. I have found that all these orders of insects have shown preference towards the shorter wavelengths of light, such as of blue and green lights, and had less of a preference towards longer wavelengths, such as yellow and red lights. I have started the second part of my research, in seeing if the orders of insects react differently to the light source, but I do not currently possess enough data to make an accurate conclusion at this time.

Category

Life Sciences

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Apr 11th, 11:00 AM Apr 11th, 12:00 PM

Preference of Insect Attraction to Different Wavelengths of Light

The relationship between insects, specifically the orders caddisflies (Trichoptera), moths (Lepidoptera) and mayflies (Ephemeroptera) and different wavelengths of light was studied to determine what wavelength is most attractive to these different insect orders and how they differ in their interaction with the light source. This is important information to protect beneficial insects while also helping eradicate destructive insects. This approach is different from previous studies because it is comparing orders of insects rather than grouping them all together. The first part of my research was conducted at night, by shining a flood light on a white sheet to watch how many insects landed on this sheet. I observed this sheet for 30-minute intervals and then let the insects disperse for 30 minutes before changing the wavelength. The wavelength would range from 450 nm to 750 nm, or in other words from blue to red in the visual spectrum. I have found that all these orders of insects have shown preference towards the shorter wavelengths of light, such as of blue and green lights, and had less of a preference towards longer wavelengths, such as yellow and red lights. I have started the second part of my research, in seeing if the orders of insects react differently to the light source, but I do not currently possess enough data to make an accurate conclusion at this time.