Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Analysis of Factors that Influence Visits to a Healthcare Professional

The health care system in the United States has changed significantly in recent years. Under the Affordable Care Act, it will continue to change. One of the key factors for improving the healthcare system is an understanding of why people use healthcare services. I examined factors that are predictive of visits to healthcare professionals over time using a longitudinal health and community participation survey. The participants in this study were people in the community, aged 18 to 96, who experienced various impairments (e.g., sensory, physical, etc.). They received four longitudinal surveys at four month intervals. The surveys were paper and pencil surveys that inquired about barriers, participation, and impairments due to pain or other health conditions. To predict healthcare utilization, I analyzed health insurance coverage, income level, depression, total number of health conditions, education level, and environmental barriers. I conducted my analysis using a multiple regression to build models showing which factors are predictive of doctor visits. Preliminary results indicated that the number of health conditions at Time 1 accounted for 5% of the variance in doctor visits at Time 2. Depression accounted for an additional 1% of this variance in doctor visits. The results of this study will contribute to our understanding of individual characteristics associated participation in the healthcare system.

Category

Social Sciences

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Apr 11th, 3:00 PM Apr 11th, 4:00 PM

Analysis of Factors that Influence Visits to a Healthcare Professional

Analysis of Factors that Influence Visits to a Healthcare Professional

The health care system in the United States has changed significantly in recent years. Under the Affordable Care Act, it will continue to change. One of the key factors for improving the healthcare system is an understanding of why people use healthcare services. I examined factors that are predictive of visits to healthcare professionals over time using a longitudinal health and community participation survey. The participants in this study were people in the community, aged 18 to 96, who experienced various impairments (e.g., sensory, physical, etc.). They received four longitudinal surveys at four month intervals. The surveys were paper and pencil surveys that inquired about barriers, participation, and impairments due to pain or other health conditions. To predict healthcare utilization, I analyzed health insurance coverage, income level, depression, total number of health conditions, education level, and environmental barriers. I conducted my analysis using a multiple regression to build models showing which factors are predictive of doctor visits. Preliminary results indicated that the number of health conditions at Time 1 accounted for 5% of the variance in doctor visits at Time 2. Depression accounted for an additional 1% of this variance in doctor visits. The results of this study will contribute to our understanding of individual characteristics associated participation in the healthcare system.