Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Determining human fitness can easily be accomplished through numerous examinations and testing methods. A majority of such tests are produced exclusively for individuals capable of free and unhindered movement. Limited attention has been paid to the evaluation and determination of fitness of wheelchair-bound individuals with various degrees of paraplegia. Professor James J. Laskin published an article in the Journal of Exercise Physiology concerning a cadence-based sub-maximal field test for predicting maximal oxygen consumption in wheelchair basketball athletes. Our goal is to employ his research in the development of a portable fitness application that promotes healthcare accessibility. The program is an Android application that employs XML for the front-end design, Java for the back-end functionality and SQLite for the database. The app allows individuals to conduct a fitness test while propelling in synchrony with a cadence at 60 pushes per minute. At the conclusion of the 5-minute fitness test, the user will be presented with a fitness evaluation. The level of fitness is calculated with functional level, distance traveled and rated perceived exertion (RPE) variables. Fitness levels are presented as values of maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max). The application interface is designed with voice and button navigation capabilities. Necessary data entry can be performed and stored on the inherent device. We hope to further the profession of physical therapy through technology and provide greater research opportunities in the years ahead.

Category

Life Sciences

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Apr 15th, 3:00 PM Apr 15th, 4:00 PM

UMove: A Mobile Sub-Maximal Fitness Test Application for Wheelchair Users

Determining human fitness can easily be accomplished through numerous examinations and testing methods. A majority of such tests are produced exclusively for individuals capable of free and unhindered movement. Limited attention has been paid to the evaluation and determination of fitness of wheelchair-bound individuals with various degrees of paraplegia. Professor James J. Laskin published an article in the Journal of Exercise Physiology concerning a cadence-based sub-maximal field test for predicting maximal oxygen consumption in wheelchair basketball athletes. Our goal is to employ his research in the development of a portable fitness application that promotes healthcare accessibility. The program is an Android application that employs XML for the front-end design, Java for the back-end functionality and SQLite for the database. The app allows individuals to conduct a fitness test while propelling in synchrony with a cadence at 60 pushes per minute. At the conclusion of the 5-minute fitness test, the user will be presented with a fitness evaluation. The level of fitness is calculated with functional level, distance traveled and rated perceived exertion (RPE) variables. Fitness levels are presented as values of maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max). The application interface is designed with voice and button navigation capabilities. Necessary data entry can be performed and stored on the inherent device. We hope to further the profession of physical therapy through technology and provide greater research opportunities in the years ahead.