Presentation Type

Poster - Campus Access Only

Abstract

Intensive comprehensive aphasia programs (ICAPs) are community rehabilitation programs designed to improve the speech, language, cognition, and psychosocial well-being of stroke survivors and their caregivers. In contrast to standard care, ICAPs provide up to six hours of treatment per day for up to five consecutive weeks. This intensive treatment provides up to 120 hours of therapy in half the amount of time that is reported in standard care. The ICAP treatment model is new, with approximately 12-15 ICAPS existing worldwide. The literature base for this innovative delivery model is just beginning to emerge.

The objective of this study is to assess psychosocial outcomes for stroke survivors participating in the University of Montana’s ICAP (UM ICAP). Based upon preliminary results and the ICAP literature, we expect improvements in the psychosocial well-being (e.g., communicative participation, depression) of our patients.

This study evaluated four cohorts of patients with aphasia who participated in UM ICAPs. Quantitative behavioral outcome measures will be reported for patients from fall 2014-summer 2016 (n=27).

The UM ICAP includes 4-5 weeks of individual and group speech-language therapy sessions, weekly support group and educational meetings, recreational outings, home programming, and technological training to support communication. Data will be analyzed from the following psychosocial outcome measures: Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Assessment of Living with Aphasia (ALA), and the Communicative Effectiveness Index (CETI). Preliminary analysis indicates that patients demonstrate reduced depression (per GDS) and increased communicative participation (per ALA, CETI). Analysis is currently in progress.

This study is multifaceted, investigating the impact of two domains of psychosocial well-being in patients with aphasia. The clinical implications of this study are significant. The efficacy demonstrated using these measures of psychosocial well-being suggests that this service delivery model (ICAP) can provide consistent and positive outcomes spanning impairment and participation domains in a relatively low-cost setting.

Category

Health and Medical Science

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Apr 28th, 11:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:00 PM

Psychosocial Improvements for Stroke Survivors Following an Intensive Comprehensive Aphasia Program

UC South Ballroom

Intensive comprehensive aphasia programs (ICAPs) are community rehabilitation programs designed to improve the speech, language, cognition, and psychosocial well-being of stroke survivors and their caregivers. In contrast to standard care, ICAPs provide up to six hours of treatment per day for up to five consecutive weeks. This intensive treatment provides up to 120 hours of therapy in half the amount of time that is reported in standard care. The ICAP treatment model is new, with approximately 12-15 ICAPS existing worldwide. The literature base for this innovative delivery model is just beginning to emerge.

The objective of this study is to assess psychosocial outcomes for stroke survivors participating in the University of Montana’s ICAP (UM ICAP). Based upon preliminary results and the ICAP literature, we expect improvements in the psychosocial well-being (e.g., communicative participation, depression) of our patients.

This study evaluated four cohorts of patients with aphasia who participated in UM ICAPs. Quantitative behavioral outcome measures will be reported for patients from fall 2014-summer 2016 (n=27).

The UM ICAP includes 4-5 weeks of individual and group speech-language therapy sessions, weekly support group and educational meetings, recreational outings, home programming, and technological training to support communication. Data will be analyzed from the following psychosocial outcome measures: Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Assessment of Living with Aphasia (ALA), and the Communicative Effectiveness Index (CETI). Preliminary analysis indicates that patients demonstrate reduced depression (per GDS) and increased communicative participation (per ALA, CETI). Analysis is currently in progress.

This study is multifaceted, investigating the impact of two domains of psychosocial well-being in patients with aphasia. The clinical implications of this study are significant. The efficacy demonstrated using these measures of psychosocial well-being suggests that this service delivery model (ICAP) can provide consistent and positive outcomes spanning impairment and participation domains in a relatively low-cost setting.