Title

Bed-Fall: Deriving Position from Acceleration to Develop an Accelerometer-Based Device for Clinical Health Settings

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

PURPOSE: We tested an accelerometer-based instrument designed to detect and distinguish human movement patterns that precede falls. The goal of the device is to prevent falls by alerting medical personnel prior to a fall. Bed-fall can be attributed to factors including compromised cognitive state, physical limitations, or muscular imbalance which impairs normal biomechanics, and is a common occurrence within the amputee and geriatric populations. 60% of nursing home residents fall each year, half of these patients experiencing multiple falling episodes (1). Injury and illness associated with falls take a substantial economic toll on our society. In the year 2000, costs associated with fatal and non-fatal falls totaled $19.2 billion in the United States, including costs for hospitalization, emergency department visits, and outpatient treatment (2). METHODS: Our subject population consisted of healthy young adults ages 18-25, and geriatric individuals living in assisted-living homes. Subjects were marked at anatomical landmarks with reflective indicators. They were filmed rising from a standard-height hospital bed with a high-speed motion capture system at a rate of 1000 hz. Two separate cameras were used, filming from different perspectives. The movement data was analyzed to obtain the 3D locations of the joint markers using the technique of Hedrick et al (3). We simultaneously obtained and analyzed movement patterns of the healthy young subjects.

Category

Health and Medical Science

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Apr 28th, 3:00 PM Apr 28th, 4:00 PM

Bed-Fall: Deriving Position from Acceleration to Develop an Accelerometer-Based Device for Clinical Health Settings

UC South Ballroom

PURPOSE: We tested an accelerometer-based instrument designed to detect and distinguish human movement patterns that precede falls. The goal of the device is to prevent falls by alerting medical personnel prior to a fall. Bed-fall can be attributed to factors including compromised cognitive state, physical limitations, or muscular imbalance which impairs normal biomechanics, and is a common occurrence within the amputee and geriatric populations. 60% of nursing home residents fall each year, half of these patients experiencing multiple falling episodes (1). Injury and illness associated with falls take a substantial economic toll on our society. In the year 2000, costs associated with fatal and non-fatal falls totaled $19.2 billion in the United States, including costs for hospitalization, emergency department visits, and outpatient treatment (2). METHODS: Our subject population consisted of healthy young adults ages 18-25, and geriatric individuals living in assisted-living homes. Subjects were marked at anatomical landmarks with reflective indicators. They were filmed rising from a standard-height hospital bed with a high-speed motion capture system at a rate of 1000 hz. Two separate cameras were used, filming from different perspectives. The movement data was analyzed to obtain the 3D locations of the joint markers using the technique of Hedrick et al (3). We simultaneously obtained and analyzed movement patterns of the healthy young subjects.