Presentation Title

Effectiveness of light therapy on superficial healing following cupping induced ecchymosis: A pilot project

Authors' Names

Hunter Lindsay

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

Introduction: The idea of using light therapy to heal musculoskeletal, dermatological, and psychological pathologies is still a concept that is emerging in the medical field. Previous research suggests that light therapy will enhance blood flow, decrease pain, and facilitate the injury recovery process. However, much of this research has not been on humans. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to evaluate the effect of two different light therapy techniques on the healing process of ecchymosis induced by cupping. Hypothesis: Our hypothesis was that both techniques of light therapy would promote superficial healing by reducing cupping induced ecchymosis. Participants: A non-random sample of six graduate students from a therapeutic modalities class (3 females and 3 males), participated in this pilot project. Methods: Three trials were conducted for this project: a control trial and light therapy delivered either using light pads or a cluster probe to the quadriceps. The Dynatron Solaris 709 triwave light pad was used to conduct one treatment trial using a red LED with dosage at 6 J/cm2 with a power output of 500mW. A Vectra Genisys model 2784 with a 4 LED probe was used for the second trial at 7 J/cm2 of energy at a contact area of 7.55 cm2. On day one, a cupping treatment was performed to both quadriceps (mid-thigh) to induce ecchymosis. Subsequently, measurements were obtained to mark the diameter of the ecchymosis on the thigh and photographs of the ecchymosis were taken. Participants then underwent a light therapy trial (either pad or probe) on the treatment leg assigned to each type of treatment. The following day, the participants ecchymosis was measured for a change in diameter. Before and after each day, ecchymosis diameter and photographs were obtained. Participants returned the following week to repeat the trial using the other form of light therapy. Data was analyzed by using SPSS software to run a 2x3 repeated measures ANOVA. Dependent Variables: Ecchymosis diameter was the dependent variable in this project. Results: Repeated measures ANOVA revealed no statistical significance between baseline and the first post-treatment measurements between the light pad and probe trials (P = .542). Additionally, there was no statistical significance among control, light pad, and probe between baseline and post-treatment measurements 24 hours after cupping (P = .363). However, a main effect for time was found among all conditions whereas measurements improved regardless of trial (P = .007).

Conclusion: While the findings of this study are not generalizable, the results did not indicate a difference in facilitating reduction of ecchymosis. Regardless of treatment, the ecchymosis resolved in all participants within 24 hours. Additional studies are warranted to determine if a difference exists between techniques of light therapy and their influence on superficial healing.

Mentor Name

Valerie Moody

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Feb 22nd, 5:00 PM Feb 22nd, 6:00 PM

Effectiveness of light therapy on superficial healing following cupping induced ecchymosis: A pilot project

UC North Ballroom

Introduction: The idea of using light therapy to heal musculoskeletal, dermatological, and psychological pathologies is still a concept that is emerging in the medical field. Previous research suggests that light therapy will enhance blood flow, decrease pain, and facilitate the injury recovery process. However, much of this research has not been on humans. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to evaluate the effect of two different light therapy techniques on the healing process of ecchymosis induced by cupping. Hypothesis: Our hypothesis was that both techniques of light therapy would promote superficial healing by reducing cupping induced ecchymosis. Participants: A non-random sample of six graduate students from a therapeutic modalities class (3 females and 3 males), participated in this pilot project. Methods: Three trials were conducted for this project: a control trial and light therapy delivered either using light pads or a cluster probe to the quadriceps. The Dynatron Solaris 709 triwave light pad was used to conduct one treatment trial using a red LED with dosage at 6 J/cm2 with a power output of 500mW. A Vectra Genisys model 2784 with a 4 LED probe was used for the second trial at 7 J/cm2 of energy at a contact area of 7.55 cm2. On day one, a cupping treatment was performed to both quadriceps (mid-thigh) to induce ecchymosis. Subsequently, measurements were obtained to mark the diameter of the ecchymosis on the thigh and photographs of the ecchymosis were taken. Participants then underwent a light therapy trial (either pad or probe) on the treatment leg assigned to each type of treatment. The following day, the participants ecchymosis was measured for a change in diameter. Before and after each day, ecchymosis diameter and photographs were obtained. Participants returned the following week to repeat the trial using the other form of light therapy. Data was analyzed by using SPSS software to run a 2x3 repeated measures ANOVA. Dependent Variables: Ecchymosis diameter was the dependent variable in this project. Results: Repeated measures ANOVA revealed no statistical significance between baseline and the first post-treatment measurements between the light pad and probe trials (P = .542). Additionally, there was no statistical significance among control, light pad, and probe between baseline and post-treatment measurements 24 hours after cupping (P = .363). However, a main effect for time was found among all conditions whereas measurements improved regardless of trial (P = .007).

Conclusion: While the findings of this study are not generalizable, the results did not indicate a difference in facilitating reduction of ecchymosis. Regardless of treatment, the ecchymosis resolved in all participants within 24 hours. Additional studies are warranted to determine if a difference exists between techniques of light therapy and their influence on superficial healing.