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Authors' Names

Joseph DehnertFollow

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Category

STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics)

Abstract/Artist Statement

Over 37,000 riparian restoration projects have been reported in the United States since 1980, but only 38% of those projects are currently being monitored; 70% of those being monitored reported that the restoration actions were not accomplishing their intended purposes. Because riparian zones serve as the connection between terrestrial and flowing freshwater ecosystems, it is important to identify and quantify their structural and functional roles in natural systems and monitor the restoration efforts being implemented. A rigorous understanding of the connection between riparian, geomorphic, and hydraulic processes provides a sound ecological foundation when identifying riparian management objectives and evaluating current, and future, land-use practices. It is known that vegetative cover in riparian zones influences stream ecosystem function by stabilizing stream banks, providing habitat and food for aquatic and terrestrial biota, and improving water quality. However, quantifying these influences demands a high cost in terms of financing, human resources, and time. Two of the biggest weaknesses in stream restoration and monitoring are: 1) subjective estimation and subsequent comparison of changes in channel form, vegetative cover, and in-stream habitat; and 2) the high costs in terms of financing, human resources, and time necessary to make these estimates. Hand-held Structure from Motion Multi-view Stereo (SfM/MVS) photogrammetric technology can solve these problems by offering a resource efficient approach for producing hyperspatial 3D models for a variety of environments. SfM/MVS photogrammetric technology is the result of cutting-edge advances in computer vision algorithms and discipline-specific research in the geosciences. By expanding the application of hand-held photogrammetric technology to stream assessment and restoration monitoring projects, it should be possible to both increase and improve data collection in terms of accuracy and efficiency. 3D models produced via hand-held cameras at close range may help to further standardize the way stream attributes are measured and quantified. The traditional approach for stream mapping using cameras is done via an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) from above. There are well-established methodologies and workflows in place for UAV studies. However, there is a gap in the literature when attempting to implement similar workflows from an oblique or on the ground perspective, especially when attempting to use consumer grade sensors like digital cameras and cell phones. Therefore, the primary goal of this research is to develop a standardized approach to stream assessment and monitoring using 3D visualizations created from consumer grade, hand-held, cameras. Ideally, this approach will provide the possibility for more frequent surveying and produce 3D models that are capable of detecting changes in bank structure, instream habitat, and vegetation within heavily vegetated riparian and stream environments. This presentation will include findings on camera selection, software workflows, and measurements that can actually be determined from the 3D visualizations of the stream.

Mentor Name

Dave Shively

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A hand-held, photogrammetric, approach to riparian and stream assessment and monitoring

Over 37,000 riparian restoration projects have been reported in the United States since 1980, but only 38% of those projects are currently being monitored; 70% of those being monitored reported that the restoration actions were not accomplishing their intended purposes. Because riparian zones serve as the connection between terrestrial and flowing freshwater ecosystems, it is important to identify and quantify their structural and functional roles in natural systems and monitor the restoration efforts being implemented. A rigorous understanding of the connection between riparian, geomorphic, and hydraulic processes provides a sound ecological foundation when identifying riparian management objectives and evaluating current, and future, land-use practices. It is known that vegetative cover in riparian zones influences stream ecosystem function by stabilizing stream banks, providing habitat and food for aquatic and terrestrial biota, and improving water quality. However, quantifying these influences demands a high cost in terms of financing, human resources, and time. Two of the biggest weaknesses in stream restoration and monitoring are: 1) subjective estimation and subsequent comparison of changes in channel form, vegetative cover, and in-stream habitat; and 2) the high costs in terms of financing, human resources, and time necessary to make these estimates. Hand-held Structure from Motion Multi-view Stereo (SfM/MVS) photogrammetric technology can solve these problems by offering a resource efficient approach for producing hyperspatial 3D models for a variety of environments. SfM/MVS photogrammetric technology is the result of cutting-edge advances in computer vision algorithms and discipline-specific research in the geosciences. By expanding the application of hand-held photogrammetric technology to stream assessment and restoration monitoring projects, it should be possible to both increase and improve data collection in terms of accuracy and efficiency. 3D models produced via hand-held cameras at close range may help to further standardize the way stream attributes are measured and quantified. The traditional approach for stream mapping using cameras is done via an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) from above. There are well-established methodologies and workflows in place for UAV studies. However, there is a gap in the literature when attempting to implement similar workflows from an oblique or on the ground perspective, especially when attempting to use consumer grade sensors like digital cameras and cell phones. Therefore, the primary goal of this research is to develop a standardized approach to stream assessment and monitoring using 3D visualizations created from consumer grade, hand-held, cameras. Ideally, this approach will provide the possibility for more frequent surveying and produce 3D models that are capable of detecting changes in bank structure, instream habitat, and vegetation within heavily vegetated riparian and stream environments. This presentation will include findings on camera selection, software workflows, and measurements that can actually be determined from the 3D visualizations of the stream.