Presentation Title

Dynamic Archaeological Approaches Concerning a Progressive Arctic and Global Realm

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor’s Full Name

Anna Prentiss

Category

Social Sciences/Humanities

Abstract/Artist Statement

Diversity and excellence are synergized together in a collaborative explorative discussion panel into contemporary and forward-thinking archaeological methodologies and approaches to at risk arctic communities. Graduate students from the University of Montana have joined to share current research endeavors into the arctic climate and its results on communities and archaeological records, while producing revolutionary processes to aid archaeological understandings and processes globally. Presentations vary from statistical analysis and spatial organizations, establishing changes in wealth and cooperation of house pit 54 in Bridge River, BC; to an introduction of a universal theoretical research model to assist archaeologist globally in the study and understandings of landscapes of abandonment. Indigenous lifeways and methods for increased advocacy and awareness are drawn upon, while highlighting the strengths of the diverse future of archaeological findings from the University of Montana’s Department of Anthropology graduate scholars under Dr. Anna Prentiss.

Megan Denis, MA, PhD Student - University of Montana (she/her): "Uncovering Cooperation in Housepit 54, Bridge River, British Columbia"

Riza McClurkin - University of Montana Graduate Student (they/them/theirs): "Modern Impacts on Traditional Subsistence Hunting in the Canadian Arctic"

Andrea Shiverdecker, MA, PhD Student - University of Montana (she/her): "A Synergy of Abandonment: Archaeological Understandings of Abandoned Norse Arctic Settlements and North American Mining Ghost Towns"

Alysha Edwards - University of Montana Graduate Student (she/her): "TBD"

Mentor Name

Anna Prentiss

Personal Statement

This panel not only shows the excellence in academic research and scholarship, but shows collaboration, peer mentorship, and diversity. Each presenter's work has a diverse range of values to the Anthropological discipline and for humanity as a whole. The goal of this panel was to take a diverse group of graduate scholars and to use a collaborative unit as a panel in order to provide support and peer mentorship for students who have anxieties with presenting. As chair of the panel, I saw very talented students who had immense fears of presentation and public speaking. By taking my experiences in presenting, and offering a supportive collaborative support working group, excellence is achieved in having graduate students expand from their comfort zones into realms of public engagement that is commonly lost in academia. The goal of this panel is to build confidence in the presenters while also building mentorship skills for the chair, while also engaging with the University of Montana community.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 4th, 9:00 AM Mar 4th, 10:00 AM

Dynamic Archaeological Approaches Concerning a Progressive Arctic and Global Realm

UC 327

Diversity and excellence are synergized together in a collaborative explorative discussion panel into contemporary and forward-thinking archaeological methodologies and approaches to at risk arctic communities. Graduate students from the University of Montana have joined to share current research endeavors into the arctic climate and its results on communities and archaeological records, while producing revolutionary processes to aid archaeological understandings and processes globally. Presentations vary from statistical analysis and spatial organizations, establishing changes in wealth and cooperation of house pit 54 in Bridge River, BC; to an introduction of a universal theoretical research model to assist archaeologist globally in the study and understandings of landscapes of abandonment. Indigenous lifeways and methods for increased advocacy and awareness are drawn upon, while highlighting the strengths of the diverse future of archaeological findings from the University of Montana’s Department of Anthropology graduate scholars under Dr. Anna Prentiss.

Megan Denis, MA, PhD Student - University of Montana (she/her): "Uncovering Cooperation in Housepit 54, Bridge River, British Columbia"

Riza McClurkin - University of Montana Graduate Student (they/them/theirs): "Modern Impacts on Traditional Subsistence Hunting in the Canadian Arctic"

Andrea Shiverdecker, MA, PhD Student - University of Montana (she/her): "A Synergy of Abandonment: Archaeological Understandings of Abandoned Norse Arctic Settlements and North American Mining Ghost Towns"

Alysha Edwards - University of Montana Graduate Student (she/her): "TBD"