Presentation Type

Poster

Faculty Mentor’s Full Name

Amy M. Glaspey

Faculty Mentor’s Department

Communication Sciences and Disorders

Abstract

When clinicians can pin-point exactly where a speech issue is originating in a child’s speech-language system, they can help the child learn more efficiently; this results in a quicker therapy process. Stackhouse, Pascoe, and Gardner (2006), presented an approach to speech therapy intervention which incorporated a three-way method. In their psycholinguistic approach, they gathered information about incoming speech, how the information was stored and processed, and the resulting production of speech by one child with a speech delay. This approach offered a more effective way to plan treatment. The current study’s goal was to explore the relationships among measures that could support the verbal aspect of the psycholinguistic model. Elements of both static and dynamic assessment methods were studied to foster better understanding of speech skills. This method was executed by comparing data from previous testing sessions of children, ages 3-7, specifically those sessions which used a standardized (static) test: the Hodson Assessment of Phonological Processes (HAPP), along with a test that measured the amount of help needed to say a sound (dynamic test): Glaspey Dynamic Assessment of Phonology (GDAP). By comparing the scores of these two tests with each other along with other client variables, the data were used to inform treatment plans for future use. Having enhanced measures that address specific areas in the psycholinguistic approach (input, storing, and output) could allow clinicians to create more appropriate treatment plans. The intention of this study was to discover how much more effectively these two kinds of measures could improve understanding of the verbal component of the approach. In using the HAPP assessment and by guiding treatment with the GDAP, the enhanced results of this “hybrid” psycholinguistic approach will be seen and described in this poster presentation.

Category

Social Sciences

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Apr 27th, 11:00 AM Apr 27th, 12:00 PM

Assessments to Enhance the Psycholinguistic Approach for Speech Sound Problems

UC South Ballroom

When clinicians can pin-point exactly where a speech issue is originating in a child’s speech-language system, they can help the child learn more efficiently; this results in a quicker therapy process. Stackhouse, Pascoe, and Gardner (2006), presented an approach to speech therapy intervention which incorporated a three-way method. In their psycholinguistic approach, they gathered information about incoming speech, how the information was stored and processed, and the resulting production of speech by one child with a speech delay. This approach offered a more effective way to plan treatment. The current study’s goal was to explore the relationships among measures that could support the verbal aspect of the psycholinguistic model. Elements of both static and dynamic assessment methods were studied to foster better understanding of speech skills. This method was executed by comparing data from previous testing sessions of children, ages 3-7, specifically those sessions which used a standardized (static) test: the Hodson Assessment of Phonological Processes (HAPP), along with a test that measured the amount of help needed to say a sound (dynamic test): Glaspey Dynamic Assessment of Phonology (GDAP). By comparing the scores of these two tests with each other along with other client variables, the data were used to inform treatment plans for future use. Having enhanced measures that address specific areas in the psycholinguistic approach (input, storing, and output) could allow clinicians to create more appropriate treatment plans. The intention of this study was to discover how much more effectively these two kinds of measures could improve understanding of the verbal component of the approach. In using the HAPP assessment and by guiding treatment with the GDAP, the enhanced results of this “hybrid” psycholinguistic approach will be seen and described in this poster presentation.