Presentation Type

Poster

Faculty Mentor’s Full Name

Anisa Goforth

Faculty Mentor’s Department

Psychology

Abstract

Microaggressions are a relatively understudied phenomena in psychology and are often not immediately recognized by even keen observers (Sue, 2010). Microaggressions are defined as any verbal, behavioral, or environmental statements or actions that are derogatory or hostile and insulting in nature, specifically targeted at a person or people (Sue, Capodilupo, Torino, Bucceri, Holder, Nadal, and Esquilin, 2007). Microaggressions are a form of racism that gradually chip away at a person’s well-being in a nearly unseen manner (Sue, 2010). Furthermore, Sue (2010) separates microaggressions into three types: microinvalidations, microinsults, and microassaults. However, it should be noted that an individual does not need to be a “racist” to commit a microaggression (Sue et al., 2007).

The current study examines how the number of microaggressions in eighth grade Montana history books have evolved over time. Studying existing data from within the lab revealed the occurrence of many microaggressions against Native Americans in eighth grade Montana specific history books (some published as early as 1951 and the most recent being published in 2008). However, the reviewed study did not examine the specific changes in microaggressions over time. Consequently, this study seeks to enhance the growing body of research by examining the shift in microaggressions in textbooks over time and further analyzing how these microaggressive statements have evolved. Previous research has identified that having a history curriculum that includes biased information about a person’s ethnic origins can be damaging to the way they perceive their school climate (Banks, 2016). This study will be beneficial to educators to help them recognize institutional racism within textbooks across time and combat this racism in their classrooms.

Method

This qualitative research project will use previously coded data and nVivo software to categorize the types of microaggressions presented across time in eighth grade Montana history textbooks.

Category

Social Sciences

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Apr 27th, 11:00 AM Apr 27th, 12:00 PM

The Evolution of Microaggressions Against Native Americans in Montana History Books

UC South Ballroom

Microaggressions are a relatively understudied phenomena in psychology and are often not immediately recognized by even keen observers (Sue, 2010). Microaggressions are defined as any verbal, behavioral, or environmental statements or actions that are derogatory or hostile and insulting in nature, specifically targeted at a person or people (Sue, Capodilupo, Torino, Bucceri, Holder, Nadal, and Esquilin, 2007). Microaggressions are a form of racism that gradually chip away at a person’s well-being in a nearly unseen manner (Sue, 2010). Furthermore, Sue (2010) separates microaggressions into three types: microinvalidations, microinsults, and microassaults. However, it should be noted that an individual does not need to be a “racist” to commit a microaggression (Sue et al., 2007).

The current study examines how the number of microaggressions in eighth grade Montana history books have evolved over time. Studying existing data from within the lab revealed the occurrence of many microaggressions against Native Americans in eighth grade Montana specific history books (some published as early as 1951 and the most recent being published in 2008). However, the reviewed study did not examine the specific changes in microaggressions over time. Consequently, this study seeks to enhance the growing body of research by examining the shift in microaggressions in textbooks over time and further analyzing how these microaggressive statements have evolved. Previous research has identified that having a history curriculum that includes biased information about a person’s ethnic origins can be damaging to the way they perceive their school climate (Banks, 2016). This study will be beneficial to educators to help them recognize institutional racism within textbooks across time and combat this racism in their classrooms.

Method

This qualitative research project will use previously coded data and nVivo software to categorize the types of microaggressions presented across time in eighth grade Montana history textbooks.