Presentation Type

Poster - Campus Access Only

Faculty Mentor’s Full Name

Dr. Catherine Off

Faculty Mentor’s Department

Communicative Sciences and Disorders

Abstract

Purpose: Caregivers of stroke survivors who have language impairments (i.e., aphasia) are known to have decreased psychosocial well-being, including increased depression and anxiety. Communication impairments from aphasia increase caregiver burden (i.e., third-party disability) and place strain on the relationship between stroke survivors and their caregiver(s). Intensive Comprehensive Aphasia Programs (ICAPs) are an emerging health care model providing holistic, intensive treatment to improve the stroke survivor's communication skills and the psychosocial well-being of both the stroke survivor and their caregiver(s). This cohort-based model targets the impairment, activity, and participation domains of the WHO-IFC model. This study will examine psychosocial outcomes of caregivers who participated in an ICAP at the University of Montana during the summer of 2017.

Methods: Eight non-paid, family caregivers of stroke survivors with aphasia participated in an ICAP lasting four weeks. Caregiver intervention included: (1) twice weekly (1.5 hours/session) group counseling provided by a licensed family counselor, and (2) weekly (1.5 hours/session) caregiver education group provided by graduate student clinicians in speech-language pathology and their licensed supervisors. Prior to and immediately following the ICAP, caregivers were administered the following self-report measures: (1) Beck Depression Inventory-II, (2) Beck Hopelessness Scale, (3) Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, (4) Perceived Stress Scale, (5) General Self-Efficacy Scale, (6) Caregiver Reaction Scale, (7) Bakas Caregiving Outcomes Scale, and (8) Family Crisis Oriented Personal Evaluation Scales. Data from these outcome measures is currently being organized for analysis. Preliminary analyses will be presented.

Significance: ICAP interventions offer unique opportunities for caregivers to participate in education, training, and social support with other caregivers. ICAP's have potential to increase communication, improve psychosocial well-being, and overall quality of life for both the stroke survivors and their caregivers.

Category

Social Sciences

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Apr 27th, 11:00 AM Apr 27th, 12:00 PM

Caregivers of Stroke Survivors with Language Impairments: The Impact of an Intensive Comprehensive Aphasia Program on Caregiver Psychosocial Well-being

UC South Ballroom

Purpose: Caregivers of stroke survivors who have language impairments (i.e., aphasia) are known to have decreased psychosocial well-being, including increased depression and anxiety. Communication impairments from aphasia increase caregiver burden (i.e., third-party disability) and place strain on the relationship between stroke survivors and their caregiver(s). Intensive Comprehensive Aphasia Programs (ICAPs) are an emerging health care model providing holistic, intensive treatment to improve the stroke survivor's communication skills and the psychosocial well-being of both the stroke survivor and their caregiver(s). This cohort-based model targets the impairment, activity, and participation domains of the WHO-IFC model. This study will examine psychosocial outcomes of caregivers who participated in an ICAP at the University of Montana during the summer of 2017.

Methods: Eight non-paid, family caregivers of stroke survivors with aphasia participated in an ICAP lasting four weeks. Caregiver intervention included: (1) twice weekly (1.5 hours/session) group counseling provided by a licensed family counselor, and (2) weekly (1.5 hours/session) caregiver education group provided by graduate student clinicians in speech-language pathology and their licensed supervisors. Prior to and immediately following the ICAP, caregivers were administered the following self-report measures: (1) Beck Depression Inventory-II, (2) Beck Hopelessness Scale, (3) Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, (4) Perceived Stress Scale, (5) General Self-Efficacy Scale, (6) Caregiver Reaction Scale, (7) Bakas Caregiving Outcomes Scale, and (8) Family Crisis Oriented Personal Evaluation Scales. Data from these outcome measures is currently being organized for analysis. Preliminary analyses will be presented.

Significance: ICAP interventions offer unique opportunities for caregivers to participate in education, training, and social support with other caregivers. ICAP's have potential to increase communication, improve psychosocial well-being, and overall quality of life for both the stroke survivors and their caregivers.