Presentation Type

Poster

Faculty Mentor’s Full Name

Catherine Off

Faculty Mentor’s Department

Communicative Sciences and Disorders

Abstract

Purpose: Intensive comprehensive aphasia programs (ICAPs) are community-based rehabilitation programs designed to improve the speech, language, cognition, and psychosocial well-being of stroke survivors. ICAPs integrate individual and group therapy, current technologies, and client/family wellness and education. Although many aphasia treatment programs exist, traditional therapy models lack the therapeutic intensity and holistic intervention approach that ICAPs provide. The intensity of ICAPs allows the patients with aphasia (PWA) to engage in 72 hours of therapy in four weeks compared to traditional aphasia therapy which offers 30 hours in 10 weeks. The purpose of this retrospective study is to examine language impairment and psychosocial outcomes of PWA following participation in an ICAP at the University of Montana.

Methods: Approximately 40 PWA participated in at least one of six ICAP sessions that occurred between 2014 and 2017. Treatment delivery included: individual evidence-based language impairment treatment, conversation groups, a weekly large group with focus on psychosocial well-being, and weekly community outings to facilitate social communication. The treatment intensity was 4-4.5 hours of therapy per day, 4 days per week, for 4 weeks. Both pre- and post-treatment assessments of language and psychosocial well-being were administered including: the Western Aphasia Battery- Revised, the Boston Naming Test-second edition, the Assessment for Living with Aphasia, and the Geriatric Depression Scale. Outcome data from the six ICAPs is currently being organized for analysis. Preliminary analyses will be presented.

Significance: Evidence suggests that the therapeutic intensity and the holistic intervention approach offered by ICAPs are beneficial to improving quality of life and communicative rehabilitation for stroke survivors with aphasia. Future service delivery models should consider this multifaceted approach as well as ways to better support autonomy and sense of respect and dignity throughout therapy.

Category

Health and Medical Science

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Apr 27th, 11:00 AM Apr 27th, 12:00 PM

Language and Psychosocial Outcomes for Stroke Survivors with Aphasia Following an Intensive Comprehensive Aphasia Program

UC South Ballroom

Purpose: Intensive comprehensive aphasia programs (ICAPs) are community-based rehabilitation programs designed to improve the speech, language, cognition, and psychosocial well-being of stroke survivors. ICAPs integrate individual and group therapy, current technologies, and client/family wellness and education. Although many aphasia treatment programs exist, traditional therapy models lack the therapeutic intensity and holistic intervention approach that ICAPs provide. The intensity of ICAPs allows the patients with aphasia (PWA) to engage in 72 hours of therapy in four weeks compared to traditional aphasia therapy which offers 30 hours in 10 weeks. The purpose of this retrospective study is to examine language impairment and psychosocial outcomes of PWA following participation in an ICAP at the University of Montana.

Methods: Approximately 40 PWA participated in at least one of six ICAP sessions that occurred between 2014 and 2017. Treatment delivery included: individual evidence-based language impairment treatment, conversation groups, a weekly large group with focus on psychosocial well-being, and weekly community outings to facilitate social communication. The treatment intensity was 4-4.5 hours of therapy per day, 4 days per week, for 4 weeks. Both pre- and post-treatment assessments of language and psychosocial well-being were administered including: the Western Aphasia Battery- Revised, the Boston Naming Test-second edition, the Assessment for Living with Aphasia, and the Geriatric Depression Scale. Outcome data from the six ICAPs is currently being organized for analysis. Preliminary analyses will be presented.

Significance: Evidence suggests that the therapeutic intensity and the holistic intervention approach offered by ICAPs are beneficial to improving quality of life and communicative rehabilitation for stroke survivors with aphasia. Future service delivery models should consider this multifaceted approach as well as ways to better support autonomy and sense of respect and dignity throughout therapy.