Presentation Type

Presentation

Faculty Mentor’s Full Name

Cassandra Hemphill

Faculty Mentor’s Department

Applied Arts and Sciences, Missoula College

Abstract

Access to clean water is a problem the world will continue to face in the future. Droughts, climate change, and contamination are just a few examples of water-related issues humans deal with daily. By addressing these problems through education, we targeted future adults by fostering positive environmental attitudes. To celebrate World Water Day on March 22nd, we held a Water Field Day for sixth graders in Lolo, Montana to supplement their science curriculum. Through hands-on activities, our target population was immersed in water issues related to water contamination and conservation. Our Water Field Day comprised multiple stations with activities including an art and poetry wall, a water contaminants scavenger hunt, a filtration station, water taste test, and a water relay race. These activities represent challenges faced by people of all ages around the world as well as here in Montana. Increasing demand on water resources combined with the complexities of climate change brings a strengthened sense of urgency to spread awareness of future water states and methods for accessing clean water supplies. Educating youth about water conservation, contamination, and filtration will help them make responsible and informed decisions throughout their lives regarding water uses, or themselves and people in other regions. Making explicit references to the water problems people face in other countries fosters empathy and encourages consideration of the water issues in a global context as well. Learning about water through hands-on activities connects children with the material so it is enjoyable to learn and easier to remember, while simultaneously providing a positive experience with natural systems, which has been shown to increase concern about the environment. Our Water Field Day incorporated all these elements to effectively communicate global water issues with our future leaders.

Category

Interdisciplinary (GLI)

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Apr 27th, 11:20 AM Apr 27th, 11:40 AM

Water and Us: Education as the First Line of Defense

UC North Ballroom

Access to clean water is a problem the world will continue to face in the future. Droughts, climate change, and contamination are just a few examples of water-related issues humans deal with daily. By addressing these problems through education, we targeted future adults by fostering positive environmental attitudes. To celebrate World Water Day on March 22nd, we held a Water Field Day for sixth graders in Lolo, Montana to supplement their science curriculum. Through hands-on activities, our target population was immersed in water issues related to water contamination and conservation. Our Water Field Day comprised multiple stations with activities including an art and poetry wall, a water contaminants scavenger hunt, a filtration station, water taste test, and a water relay race. These activities represent challenges faced by people of all ages around the world as well as here in Montana. Increasing demand on water resources combined with the complexities of climate change brings a strengthened sense of urgency to spread awareness of future water states and methods for accessing clean water supplies. Educating youth about water conservation, contamination, and filtration will help them make responsible and informed decisions throughout their lives regarding water uses, or themselves and people in other regions. Making explicit references to the water problems people face in other countries fosters empathy and encourages consideration of the water issues in a global context as well. Learning about water through hands-on activities connects children with the material so it is enjoyable to learn and easier to remember, while simultaneously providing a positive experience with natural systems, which has been shown to increase concern about the environment. Our Water Field Day incorporated all these elements to effectively communicate global water issues with our future leaders.