Presentation Type

Poster

Faculty Mentor’s Full Name

Allen Szalde-Petree

Faculty Mentor’s Department

Psychology

Abstract

Beta splendens have been the animal subject to test several, non-invasive drug therapies. The results can then be examined as to what effect they will have on humans. In the main experiment, B. splendens’ innate aggressive behavior was examined when the subject were exposed to Fluoxetine, an antidepressant. Data collection comparing the male species of B. splendens involved exposure to a female of B. splendens and dosage of Fluoxetine to observe the effects on their innate aggressive behavior. My part of the experiment is centered around examining whether there was any female bias among the male subjects that would go onto skew the results of the larger study. This project was designed as a manipulation check to see that the exposure to Fluoxetine would suppress aggressive behavior and the exposure to a female would increase aggressive behavior. When the two variables were combined, it is hypothesized that they will return the subject to a baseline aggressive measure. During this experiment, three different female B. splendenswere used at a time. The female B. splendens subjects were kept in separate tanks out of sight of the male B. splendens subjects. The male B. splendens alternated females each day of data collection. In order to ensure limited bias, this experiment examined the courting average of each male exposed to each female. Data was recorded with the larger experiment and averages were taken each day for each male and correlated to which female the male B. splendens had been exposed to. Data analysis is still ongoing to determine whether female bias among the male B. splendens is present.

Category

Social Sciences

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Apr 27th, 3:00 PM Apr 27th, 4:00 PM

Of Betta splendens and speed dating: an analytical view

UC South Ballroom

Beta splendens have been the animal subject to test several, non-invasive drug therapies. The results can then be examined as to what effect they will have on humans. In the main experiment, B. splendens’ innate aggressive behavior was examined when the subject were exposed to Fluoxetine, an antidepressant. Data collection comparing the male species of B. splendens involved exposure to a female of B. splendens and dosage of Fluoxetine to observe the effects on their innate aggressive behavior. My part of the experiment is centered around examining whether there was any female bias among the male subjects that would go onto skew the results of the larger study. This project was designed as a manipulation check to see that the exposure to Fluoxetine would suppress aggressive behavior and the exposure to a female would increase aggressive behavior. When the two variables were combined, it is hypothesized that they will return the subject to a baseline aggressive measure. During this experiment, three different female B. splendenswere used at a time. The female B. splendens subjects were kept in separate tanks out of sight of the male B. splendens subjects. The male B. splendens alternated females each day of data collection. In order to ensure limited bias, this experiment examined the courting average of each male exposed to each female. Data was recorded with the larger experiment and averages were taken each day for each male and correlated to which female the male B. splendens had been exposed to. Data analysis is still ongoing to determine whether female bias among the male B. splendens is present.