Title

Do I Belong Here? (In)Visibility caused by microaggressions on campus

Presenter Information

Jazzie Johnson

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

I am reminded of my racial identity multiple times each day. Sometimes, these experiences can be positive, like support from other people of color or when I go to Black Student Union meetings. However, these reminders come from someone refusing to acknowledge me, grabbing my hair or someone acting surprised that I am "so articulate." These subtle jabs, called microaggressions may be based on race, class, sexual orientation, gender identity, ability or religion. They may seem harmless, but they add up quickly and take an emotional toll on students, implying that we do not belong in these spaces. This work's purpose is to give a glimpse into the lives ofUM students who are outside the "norm" on campus. Students filled out a survey with questions about how many times they became aware of their identity in negative and positive ways. They described the context of the interaction, how it made them feel and if there were any short- or long-term repercussions. From responses so far, some students say they feel invisible as a result of some of the microaggressions they face on campus. Some even wish that they could leave UM. My results so far highlight the additional burdens many students have to bear in order to complete their education. They also highlight the reality of how far UM has to go in order to become a truly inclusive institution as part of its mission states.

Category

Social Sciences

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Apr 17th, 1:40 PM Apr 17th, 2:00 PM

Do I Belong Here? (In)Visibility caused by microaggressions on campus

UC 326

I am reminded of my racial identity multiple times each day. Sometimes, these experiences can be positive, like support from other people of color or when I go to Black Student Union meetings. However, these reminders come from someone refusing to acknowledge me, grabbing my hair or someone acting surprised that I am "so articulate." These subtle jabs, called microaggressions may be based on race, class, sexual orientation, gender identity, ability or religion. They may seem harmless, but they add up quickly and take an emotional toll on students, implying that we do not belong in these spaces. This work's purpose is to give a glimpse into the lives ofUM students who are outside the "norm" on campus. Students filled out a survey with questions about how many times they became aware of their identity in negative and positive ways. They described the context of the interaction, how it made them feel and if there were any short- or long-term repercussions. From responses so far, some students say they feel invisible as a result of some of the microaggressions they face on campus. Some even wish that they could leave UM. My results so far highlight the additional burdens many students have to bear in order to complete their education. They also highlight the reality of how far UM has to go in order to become a truly inclusive institution as part of its mission states.