Presenter Information

Kaylee E. OsentowskiFollow

Presentation Type

Presentation

Faculty Mentor’s Full Name

Nicole B

Faculty Mentor’s Department

Dance

Abstract

I examined The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams, a play that first premiered in 1944, to develop a movement piece the was within the genre of "memory play" to create a theatrical dance movement piece. This research was presented through a dance piece in UM Theatre and Dance's production of Dance Up Close 2018 entitled "How Easily Broken". I explored the development of text and movement complimenting each other, how internal emotions can be expressed through the universal language of movement, and how a classical play can be condensed, into its deepest meaning, within ten minutes. With my focus on the script of The Glass Menagerie, I was able to place many themes involving family dynamics, memory, and anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder into the movement piece I presented.

Beginning in September 2018, I attended auditions, choreographed rehearsals, participated in design and production meetings, and developed theatrical technical elements for my work. I worked with four other artists who are the performers featured in the movement piece. By working with other artists, in varying disciplines surrounding theatre and dance, the cross collaboration of the art forms further developed the quality of the work presented.

This research is relevant because cross collaboration between artistic disciplines is important to developing unique and new ideas. By addressing themes, such as memory, in text and movement practices the audience viewing the work can have a deeper understanding of what is being presented to them. Finally, by building on classical art, such as the script of The Glass Menagerie, artists in the present can explain significance in theme and artistic value to a new generation.

Category

Visual and Performing Arts (including Creative Writing)

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Apr 17th, 4:00 PM Apr 17th, 4:20 PM

“How Easily Broken”: An Accumulating Work about Memory through Theatrical Dance Practices

UC 333

I examined The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams, a play that first premiered in 1944, to develop a movement piece the was within the genre of "memory play" to create a theatrical dance movement piece. This research was presented through a dance piece in UM Theatre and Dance's production of Dance Up Close 2018 entitled "How Easily Broken". I explored the development of text and movement complimenting each other, how internal emotions can be expressed through the universal language of movement, and how a classical play can be condensed, into its deepest meaning, within ten minutes. With my focus on the script of The Glass Menagerie, I was able to place many themes involving family dynamics, memory, and anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder into the movement piece I presented.

Beginning in September 2018, I attended auditions, choreographed rehearsals, participated in design and production meetings, and developed theatrical technical elements for my work. I worked with four other artists who are the performers featured in the movement piece. By working with other artists, in varying disciplines surrounding theatre and dance, the cross collaboration of the art forms further developed the quality of the work presented.

This research is relevant because cross collaboration between artistic disciplines is important to developing unique and new ideas. By addressing themes, such as memory, in text and movement practices the audience viewing the work can have a deeper understanding of what is being presented to them. Finally, by building on classical art, such as the script of The Glass Menagerie, artists in the present can explain significance in theme and artistic value to a new generation.