Presentation Type

Presentation

Faculty Mentor’s Full Name

Anya Jabour

Faculty Mentor’s Department

History

Abstract

In this sketch, the life and accomplishments of Frieda Fligelman will be explored in depth. Frieda Fligelman was a suffragist based out of Helena, Montana who made great strides for women in higher education and scholarly work. Frieda Fligelman comes from a family of feminist activists with her sister Belle Fligelman Winestine working on Jeanette Rankin’s campaign and working as her secretary. Frieda was the first woman ever admitted to the Ph.D. program of Columbia’s Political Science field. She worked with renowned anthropologist Franz Boas, as well as breaking major ground in the field of Linguistic Anthropology with her work on the West African Language of Fulani. Sadly, not recognized for her genius at the time she continued to publish many works on West African culture and language, even without the backing of Columbia. Through an examination of archival sources and her published writings including a book of her poems called Notes of a Novel, I hope to highlight the incredible contributions of Frieda Fligelman, as well as shine a much-deserved light on the struggles she faced as a woman in her pursuit of higher education and scholarly work.

Category

Humanities

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Apr 17th, 4:40 PM Apr 17th, 5:00 PM

Frieda Fligelman: Feminist Academic

UC 333

In this sketch, the life and accomplishments of Frieda Fligelman will be explored in depth. Frieda Fligelman was a suffragist based out of Helena, Montana who made great strides for women in higher education and scholarly work. Frieda Fligelman comes from a family of feminist activists with her sister Belle Fligelman Winestine working on Jeanette Rankin’s campaign and working as her secretary. Frieda was the first woman ever admitted to the Ph.D. program of Columbia’s Political Science field. She worked with renowned anthropologist Franz Boas, as well as breaking major ground in the field of Linguistic Anthropology with her work on the West African Language of Fulani. Sadly, not recognized for her genius at the time she continued to publish many works on West African culture and language, even without the backing of Columbia. Through an examination of archival sources and her published writings including a book of her poems called Notes of a Novel, I hope to highlight the incredible contributions of Frieda Fligelman, as well as shine a much-deserved light on the struggles she faced as a woman in her pursuit of higher education and scholarly work.