Presentation Type

Poster

Faculty Mentor’s Full Name

Amy Glaspey

Faculty Mentor’s Department

Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences

Abstract

Children with speech sound disorders (SSD) produce incorrect speech sounds in observable patterns known as phonological processes. Previous research by MacLeod and Glaspey (2018) showed that children’s phonological processes differed based on the child’s native language. In their research, MacLeod and Glaspey compared the phonological process inventories of French- and English-speaking children.They found that English-speaking children produce a significantly larger inventory of phonological processes than French-speaking children. The purpose of the current study is to find more specific developmental data for both of the languages by comparing the frequency of phonological processes produced by French-speaking children with speech sound disorders and English-speaking children with speech sound disorders.

The methods for this study included a cross sectional design of French and English-speaking children aged three to six years old. Speech samples were collected from all children using a list of single-word productions during a picture-naming task. Samples were analyzed by tallying the frequency of all phonological processes produced.Comparing the frequency of phonological processes between the two languages provides insight into the phonological similarities of French and English-speaking children with speech sound disorders.

The significance of this study, is that these data can be used by speech-language pathologists to create more accurate, as well as more individualized, assessment and treatment plans for children with speech sound disorders. This data could also reveal universal trends in all language learners and go beyond monolingual children to have implications with bilingual children as well. As the number of bilingual children increase in the United States, it will become increasingly important for speech-language pathologists to understand the phonological processes of languages other than English. Ultimately, additional data on speech sound disorders in multiple languages will improve assessment and treatment for children of all linguistic backgrounds.

Category

Social Sciences

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Apr 17th, 11:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 PM

A Comparative Study of Phonological Processes Between Canadian-French-Speaking and American-English-Speaking Children with Speech Sound Disorders

UC South Ballroom

Children with speech sound disorders (SSD) produce incorrect speech sounds in observable patterns known as phonological processes. Previous research by MacLeod and Glaspey (2018) showed that children’s phonological processes differed based on the child’s native language. In their research, MacLeod and Glaspey compared the phonological process inventories of French- and English-speaking children.They found that English-speaking children produce a significantly larger inventory of phonological processes than French-speaking children. The purpose of the current study is to find more specific developmental data for both of the languages by comparing the frequency of phonological processes produced by French-speaking children with speech sound disorders and English-speaking children with speech sound disorders.

The methods for this study included a cross sectional design of French and English-speaking children aged three to six years old. Speech samples were collected from all children using a list of single-word productions during a picture-naming task. Samples were analyzed by tallying the frequency of all phonological processes produced.Comparing the frequency of phonological processes between the two languages provides insight into the phonological similarities of French and English-speaking children with speech sound disorders.

The significance of this study, is that these data can be used by speech-language pathologists to create more accurate, as well as more individualized, assessment and treatment plans for children with speech sound disorders. This data could also reveal universal trends in all language learners and go beyond monolingual children to have implications with bilingual children as well. As the number of bilingual children increase in the United States, it will become increasingly important for speech-language pathologists to understand the phonological processes of languages other than English. Ultimately, additional data on speech sound disorders in multiple languages will improve assessment and treatment for children of all linguistic backgrounds.